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Cross-axis adaptation improves 3D vestibulo-ocular reflex alignment during chronic stimulation via a head-mounted multichannel vestibular prosthesis

Overview of attention for article published in Experimental Brain Research, March 2011
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Title
Cross-axis adaptation improves 3D vestibulo-ocular reflex alignment during chronic stimulation via a head-mounted multichannel vestibular prosthesis
Published in
Experimental Brain Research, March 2011
DOI 10.1007/s00221-011-2591-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chenkai Dai, Gene Y. Fridman, Bryce Chiang, Natan S. Davidovics, Thuy-Anh Melvin, Kathleen E. Cullen, Charles C. Della Santina

Abstract

By sensing three-dimensional (3D) head rotation and electrically stimulating the three ampullary branches of a vestibular nerve to encode head angular velocity, a multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) can restore vestibular sensation to individuals disabled by loss of vestibular hair cell function. However, current spread to afferent fibers innervating non-targeted canals and otolith end organs can distort the vestibular nerve activation pattern, causing misalignment between the perceived and actual axis of head rotation. We hypothesized that over time, central neural mechanisms can adapt to correct this misalignment. To test this, we rendered five chinchillas vestibular deficient via bilateral gentamicin treatment and unilaterally implanted them with a head-mounted MVP. Comparison of 3D angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) responses during 2 Hz, 50°/s peak horizontal sinusoidal head rotations in darkness on the first, third, and seventh days of continual MVP use revealed that eye responses about the intended axis remained stable (at about 70% of the normal gain) while misalignment improved significantly by the end of 1 week of prosthetic stimulation. A comparable time course of improvement was also observed for head rotations about the other two semicircular canal axes and at every stimulus frequency examined (0.2-5 Hz). In addition, the extent of disconjugacy between the two eyes progressively improved during the same time window. These results indicate that the central nervous system rapidly adapts to multichannel prosthetic vestibular stimulation to markedly improve 3D aVOR alignment within the first week after activation. Similar adaptive improvements are likely to occur in other species, including humans.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Korea, Republic of 1 2%
France 1 2%
Australia 1 2%
Switzerland 1 2%
Unknown 37 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 27%
Researcher 8 20%
Student > Master 7 17%
Professor 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 7 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 32%
Engineering 9 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 20%
Neuroscience 4 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 5 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2011.
All research outputs
#7,636,495
of 12,219,322 outputs
Outputs from Experimental Brain Research
#1,278
of 2,140 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,351
of 79,014 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Experimental Brain Research
#8
of 16 outputs
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