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Football injuries during European Championships 2004–2005

Overview of attention for article published in Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, March 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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Readers on

mendeley
74 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
Title
Football injuries during European Championships 2004–2005
Published in
Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, March 2007
DOI 10.1007/s00167-007-0290-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Markus Waldén, Martin Hägglund, Jan Ekstrand

Abstract

The risk of injury in football is high, but few studies have compared men's and women's football injuries. The purpose of this prospective study was to analyse the exposure and injury characteristics of European Championships in football and to compare data for men, women and male youth players. The national teams of all 32 countries (672 players) that qualified to the men's European Championship 2004, the women's European Championship 2005 and the men's Under-19 European Championship 2005 were studied. Individual training and match exposure was documented during the tournaments as well as time loss injuries. The overall injury incidence was 14 times higher during match play than during training (34.6 vs. 2.4 injuries per 1000 h, P < 0.0001). There were no differences in match and training injury incidences between the championships. Teams eliminated in the women's championship had a significantly higher match injury incidence compared to teams going to the semi-finals (65.4 vs. 5.0 injuries per 1000 h, P = 0.02). Non-contact mechanisms were ascribed for 41% of the match injuries. One-fifth of all injuries were severe with absence from play longer than 4 weeks. In conclusion, injury incidences during the European Championships studied were very similar and it seems thus that the risk of injury in international football is at least not higher in women than in men. The teams eliminated in the women's championship had a significantly higher match injury incidence than the teams going to the final stage. Finally, the high frequency of non-contact injury is worrying from a prevention perspective and should be addressed in future studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 74 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Unknown 72 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 16%
Researcher 12 16%
Student > Bachelor 11 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 14%
Student > Postgraduate 8 11%
Other 21 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 34 46%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 23%
Unspecified 11 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Other 5 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2018.
All research outputs
#7,550,517
of 13,099,076 outputs
Outputs from Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy
#914
of 1,643 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,099
of 189,016 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy
#29
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,099,076 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,643 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,016 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.