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Beyond death and dying: how Chinese spouses navigate the final days with their loved ones suffering from terminal cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Supportive Care in Cancer, August 2017
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2 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

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22 Mendeley
Title
Beyond death and dying: how Chinese spouses navigate the final days with their loved ones suffering from terminal cancer
Published in
Supportive Care in Cancer, August 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-3844-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

B. P. M. Chung, D. Leung, S. M. Leung, A. Y. Loke

Abstract

While advances in biomedicine exist for cancer, its diagnosis and treatment still bring the threat of mortality to the forefront of spouses' lives. Family conflict is largely due to unmet expectations that generate a lot of physical and emotional distress for spouses, as the primary surrogates. Moreover, older individuals in Hong Kong tend to lack control of where they die and who is present at the end of their lives. Deeper understanding of Chinese spouses' perspectives is needed to generate new insights, particularly in how spouses cope with caregiving. The aim of the study was to explore the Chinese spousal experience with their dying loved ones suffering from terminal cancer. A qualitative study using interpretive description was conducted. Spousal caregivers were purposively recruited through a hospice unit of two regional hospitals in Hong Kong, China. Documentary sources were used as secondary data. Fifteen individuals, consisting of seven men and eight women, participated in individual interviews. The overarching theme was a socially constructed "we" experience of confronting mortality, characterized by five subthemes: (a) balancing end-of-life tension between cure and comfort, (b) prioritizing the family goals and concerns, (c) de-medicalizing caregiving, (d) working for mutuality, and (e) creating a legacy of love. The study suggests that clinicians might consider harnessing the capacity of spouses to help work through confronting experiences of mortality and transforming events for goals that go beyond death. This places a major emphasis on salutary strategies surrounding transitions from curative to palliative care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 18%
Unspecified 4 18%
Student > Bachelor 4 18%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 8 36%
Psychology 7 32%
Unspecified 5 23%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 5%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2018.
All research outputs
#9,774,672
of 12,755,705 outputs
Outputs from Supportive Care in Cancer
#1,824
of 2,472 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#178,306
of 264,695 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Supportive Care in Cancer
#44
of 69 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,755,705 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,472 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,695 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.