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Water quality and health in northern Canada: stored drinking water and acute gastrointestinal illness in Labrador Inuit

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Pollution Research, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
Title
Water quality and health in northern Canada: stored drinking water and acute gastrointestinal illness in Labrador Inuit
Published in
Environmental Science & Pollution Research, July 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11356-017-9695-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carlee J. Wright, Jan M. Sargeant, Victoria L. Edge, James D. Ford, Khosrow Farahbakhsh, Inez Shiwak, Charlie Flowers, Sherilee L. Harper

Abstract

One of the highest self-reported incidence rates of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) in the global peer-reviewed literature occurs in Inuit communities in the Canadian Arctic. This high incidence of illness could be due, in part, to the consumption of contaminated water, as many northern communities face challenges related to the quality of municipal drinking water. Furthermore, many Inuit store drinking water in containers in the home, which could increase the risk of contamination between source and point-of-use (i.e., water recontamination during storage). To examine this risk, this research characterized drinking water collection and storage practices, identified potential risk factors for water contamination between source and point-of-use, and examined possible associations between drinking water contamination and self-reported AGI in the Inuit community of Rigolet, Canada. The study included a cross-sectional census survey that captured data on types of drinking water used, household practices related to drinking water (e.g., how it was collected and stored), physical characteristics of water storage containers, and self-reported AGI. Additionally, water samples were collected from all identified drinking water containers in homes and analyzed for presence of Escherichia coli and total coliforms. Despite municipally treated tap water being available in all homes, 77.6% of households had alternative sources of drinking water stored in containers, and of these containers, 25.2% tested positive for total coliforms. The use of transfer devices and water dippers (i.e., smaller bowls or measuring cups) for the collection and retrieval of water from containers were both significantly associated with increased odds of total coliform presence in stored water (ORtransfer device = 3.4, 95% CI 1.2-11.7; ORdipper = 13.4, 95% CI 3.8-47.1). Twenty-eight-day period prevalence of self-reported AGI during the month before the survey was 17.2% (95% CI 13.0-22.5), which yielded an annual incidence rate of 2.4 cases per person per year (95% CI 1.8-3.1); no water-related risk factors were significantly associated with AGI. Considering the high prevalence of, and risk factors associated with, indicator bacteria in drinking water stored in containers, potential exposure to waterborne pathogens may be minimized through interventions at the household level.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 26%
Student > Bachelor 9 21%
Unspecified 8 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Researcher 4 9%
Other 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 13 30%
Environmental Science 10 23%
Social Sciences 4 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Engineering 3 7%
Other 9 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2017.
All research outputs
#743,007
of 11,805,455 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#73
of 3,018 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,523
of 268,300 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#5
of 174 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,805,455 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,018 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,300 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 174 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.