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Feasibility and safety of virtual-reality-based early neurocognitive stimulation in critically ill patients

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Intensive Care, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

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19 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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98 Mendeley
Title
Feasibility and safety of virtual-reality-based early neurocognitive stimulation in critically ill patients
Published in
Annals of Intensive Care, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13613-017-0303-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marc Turon, Sol Fernandez-Gonzalo, Mercè Jodar, Gemma Gomà, Jaume Montanya, David Hernando, Raquel Bailón, Candelaria de Haro, Victor Gomez-Simon, Josefina Lopez-Aguilar, Rudys Magrans, Melcior Martinez-Perez, Joan Carles Oliva, Lluís Blanch

Abstract

Growing evidence suggests that critical illness often results in significant long-term neurocognitive impairments in one-third of survivors. Although these neurocognitive impairments are long-lasting and devastating for survivors, rehabilitation rarely occurs during or after critical illness. Our aim is to describe an early neurocognitive stimulation intervention based on virtual reality for patients who are critically ill and to present the results of a proof-of-concept study testing the feasibility, safety, and suitability of this intervention. Twenty critically ill adult patients undergoing or having undergone mechanical ventilation for ≥24 h received daily 20-min neurocognitive stimulation sessions when awake and alert during their ICU stay. The difficulty of the exercises included in the sessions progressively increased over successive sessions. Physiological data were recorded before, during, and after each session. Safety was assessed through heart rate, peripheral oxygen saturation, and respiratory rate. Heart rate variability analysis, an indirect measure of autonomic activity sensitive to cognitive demands, was used to assess the efficacy of the exercises in stimulating attention and working memory. Patients successfully completed the sessions on most days. No sessions were stopped early for safety concerns, and no adverse events occurred. Heart rate variability analysis showed that the exercises stimulated attention and working memory. Critically ill patients considered the sessions enjoyable and relaxing without being overly fatiguing. The results in this proof-of-concept study suggest that a virtual-reality-based neurocognitive intervention is feasible, safe, and tolerable, stimulating cognitive functions and satisfying critically ill patients. Future studies will evaluate the impact of interventions on neurocognitive outcomes. Trial registration Clinical trials.gov identifier: NCT02078206.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 98 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 21 21%
Student > Master 18 18%
Researcher 15 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 4%
Other 7 7%
Unknown 24 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 24%
Psychology 9 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 9%
Neuroscience 6 6%
Engineering 6 6%
Other 15 15%
Unknown 29 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 July 2018.
All research outputs
#1,849,168
of 19,240,244 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Intensive Care
#198
of 889 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,493
of 283,292 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Intensive Care
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,240,244 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 889 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,292 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them