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Long-term abstinence and predictors of tobacco treatment uptake among hospitalized smokers with serious mental illness enrolled in a smoking cessation trial

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Behavioral Medicine, March 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
Title
Long-term abstinence and predictors of tobacco treatment uptake among hospitalized smokers with serious mental illness enrolled in a smoking cessation trial
Published in
Journal of Behavioral Medicine, March 2017
DOI 10.1007/s10865-017-9844-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erin S. Rogers, Rebecca Friedes, Annika Jakes, Ellie Grossman, Alissa Link, Scott E. Sherman

Abstract

Hospital patients with serious mental illness (SMI) have high rates of smoking. There are few post-discharge treatment models available for this population and limited research on their treatment uptake following discharge. This study is a secondary analysis of an RCT that compared multi-session intensive telephone counseling versus referral to state quitline counseling at two safety net hospitals in New York City. For this analysis, we selected all trial participants with a history of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or bipolar disorder (N = 384) and used multivariable logistic regression to compare groups on self-reported 30-day abstinence at 6 months and to identify patient factors associated with use of tobacco treatment. Analyses found no significant group differences in abstinence 6 months (28% quitline vs. 29% intervention, p > 0.05), use of cessation medications (42% quitline vs. 47% intervention, p > 0.05) or receipt of at least one counseling call (47% quitline vs. 42% intervention, p > 0.05). Patients with hazardous drinking (p = 0.04) or perceived good health (p = 0.03) were less likely to use cessation medications. Homeless patients were less likely to use counseling (p = 0.02). Most patients did not use cessation treatment after discharge, and the intensive intervention did not improve abstinence rates over quitline referral. Interventions are needed to improve use of cessation treatment and long-term abstinence in patients with SMI.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 20%
Student > Bachelor 5 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 20%
Other 4 16%
Student > Master 2 8%
Other 4 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 28%
Unspecified 6 24%
Psychology 6 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Other 3 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2017.
All research outputs
#6,044,284
of 11,563,317 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Behavioral Medicine
#425
of 705 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,006
of 265,778 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Behavioral Medicine
#8
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,563,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 705 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,778 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.