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Nicotine effects on adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Overview of attention for article published in Psychopharmacology, January 1996
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
20 tweeters
patent
5 patents
facebook
1 Facebook page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
317 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
94 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
Nicotine effects on adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
Published in
Psychopharmacology, January 1996
DOI 10.1007/bf02246281
Pubmed ID
Authors

E. D. Levin, C. K. Conners, E. Sparrow, S. C. Hinton, D. Erhardt, W. H. Meck, J. E. Rose, J. March

Abstract

Several lines of evidence suggest that nicotine may be useful in treating the symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The current study was an acute, placebo-controlled double-blind experiment to determine whether nicotine might be useful as an alternative treatment of adults with ADHD symptomatology. Six smokers and 11 nonsmokers who were outpatient referrals for ADHD were diagnosed by DSM-IV criteria. Measures of treatment effect included the Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) scale, Hopkins' symptom check list (SCL-90-R), the Profile of Mood States (POMS), Conners' computerized Continuous Performance Test (CPT), the Stroop test, and an interval-timing task. The smokers underwent overnight deprivation from smoking and were given a 21 mg/day nicotine skin patch for 4.5 h during a morning session. The nonsmokers were given a 7 mg/day nicotine skin patch for 4.5 h during a morning session. Active and placebo patches were given in a counter-balanced order approximately 1 week apart. Nicotine caused a significant overall nicotine-induced improvement on the CGI. This effect was significant when only the nonsmokers were considered, which indicated that it was not due merely to withdrawal relief. Nicotine caused significantly increased vigor as measured by the POMS test. Nicotine caused an overall significant reduction in reaction time (RT) on the CPT, as well as, with the smokers, a significant reduction in another index of inattention, variability in reaction time over trial blocks. Nicotine improved accuracy of time estimation and lowered variability of time-estimation response curves. Because improvements occurred among nonsmokers, the nicotine effect appears not to be merely a relief of withdrawal symptoms. It is concluded that nicotine deserves further clinical trials with ADHD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 4%
Australia 1 1%
France 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
India 1 1%
Hungary 1 1%
Unknown 84 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 21%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 9%
Student > Master 8 9%
Other 25 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 35 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 18%
Unspecified 13 14%
Neuroscience 9 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 7%
Other 13 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 43. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 March 2019.
All research outputs
#393,562
of 13,410,167 outputs
Outputs from Psychopharmacology
#115
of 4,308 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,644
of 188,826 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychopharmacology
#2
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,410,167 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,308 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,826 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.