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A Brief Review of Critical Processes in Exercise-Induced Muscular Hypertrophy

Overview of attention for article published in Sports Medicine, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
192 tweeters
facebook
12 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
video
12 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
79 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
537 Mendeley
Title
A Brief Review of Critical Processes in Exercise-Induced Muscular Hypertrophy
Published in
Sports Medicine, May 2014
DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0152-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stuart M. Phillips

Abstract

With regular practice, resistance exercise can lead to gains in skeletal muscle mass by means of hypertrophy. The process of skeletal muscle fiber hypertrophy comes about as a result of the confluence of positive muscle protein balance and satellite cell addition to muscle fibers. Positive muscle protein balance is achieved when the rate of new muscle protein synthesis (MPS) exceeds that of muscle protein breakdown (MPB). While resistance exercise and postprandial hyperaminoacidemia both stimulate MPS, it is through the synergistic effects of these two stimuli that a net gain in muscle proteins occurs and muscle fiber hypertrophy takes place. Current evidence favors the post-exercise period as a time when rapid hyperaminoacidemia promotes a marked rise in the rate of MPS. Dietary proteins with a full complement of essential amino acids and high leucine contents that are rapidly digested are more likely to be efficacious in this regard. Various other compounds have been added to complete proteins, including carbohydrate, arginine and glutamine, in an attempt to augment the effectiveness of the protein in stimulating MPS (or suppressing MPB), but none has proved particularly effective. Evidence points to a higher protein intake in combination with resistance exercise as being efficacious in allowing preservation, and on occasion increases, in skeletal muscle mass with dietary energy restriction aimed at the promotion of weight loss. The goal of this review is to examine practices of protein ingestion in combination with resistance exercise that have some evidence for efficacy and to highlight future areas for investigation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 192 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 537 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 11 2%
Spain 6 1%
United States 5 <1%
Norway 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Greece 1 <1%
Other 4 <1%
Unknown 503 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 147 27%
Student > Bachelor 98 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 62 12%
Researcher 48 9%
Other 38 7%
Other 144 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 208 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 93 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 72 13%
Unspecified 50 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 41 8%
Other 73 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 219. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 October 2019.
All research outputs
#61,246
of 13,756,527 outputs
Outputs from Sports Medicine
#54
of 2,232 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#845
of 189,463 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sports Medicine
#6
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,756,527 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,232 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 32.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,463 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.