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Cost-effectiveness of preimplantation genetic screening for women older than 37 undergoing in vitro fertilization

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Assisted Reproduction & Genetics, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
Title
Cost-effectiveness of preimplantation genetic screening for women older than 37 undergoing in vitro fertilization
Published in
Journal of Assisted Reproduction & Genetics, July 2017
DOI 10.1007/s10815-017-1001-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephen C. Collins, Xiao Xu, Winifred Mak

Abstract

Adding preimplantation genetic screening to in vitro fertilization has been shown to increase live birth rate in women older than 37. However, preimplantation genetic screening is an expensive procedure. Information on the cost-effectiveness of preimplantation genetic screening can help inform clinical decision making. We constructed a decision analytic model for a hypothetical fresh, autologous in vitro fertilization cycle (with versus without preimplantation genetic screening) for women older than age 37 who had a successful oocyte retrieval and development of at least one blastocyst. The model incorporated probability and cost estimates of relevant clinical events based on data from published literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to examine the impact of changes in model input parameters. In base-case analysis, IVF-PGS offered a 4.2 percentage point increase in live birth rate for an additional cost of $4509, yielding an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $105,489 per additional live birth. This ICER was below the expected cost of $145,063 for achieving one live birth with IVF (assuming an average LBR of 13.4% and $19,415 per cycle for this patient population). Sensitivity analysis suggested that ICER improved substantially with decreases in PGS cost and increases in PGS effectiveness. Monte Carlo simulation showed PGS to be cost-effective in 93.9% of iterations at an acceptability cutoff of $145,063. Considering the expected cost of achieving one live birth with IVF, PGS is a cost-effective strategy for women older than 37 undergoing IVF. Additional research on patients' willingness-to-pay per live birth would further inform our understanding regarding the cost-effectiveness of PGS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 8 20%
Researcher 8 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 18%
Lecturer 4 10%
Student > Master 4 10%
Other 9 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 33%
Unspecified 12 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Other 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2017.
All research outputs
#1,791,024
of 12,196,902 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Assisted Reproduction & Genetics
#71
of 804 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,543
of 267,511 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Assisted Reproduction & Genetics
#2
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,196,902 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 804 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,511 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.