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Genetic and Environmental Influences on Cross-Gender Behavior and Relation to Behavior Problems: A Study of Dutch Twins at Ages 7 and 10 Years

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Sexual Behavior, November 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
18 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
1 Facebook page
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

dimensions_citation
64 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Genetic and Environmental Influences on Cross-Gender Behavior and Relation to Behavior Problems: A Study of Dutch Twins at Ages 7 and 10 Years
Published in
Archives of Sexual Behavior, November 2006
DOI 10.1007/s10508-006-9072-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

C. E. M. van Beijsterveldt, James J. Hudziak, Dorret I. Boomsma

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of cross-gender behavior during childhood, to estimate the influence of genotype and environment on variation in cross-gender behavior, and to explore the association of cross-gender behavior with maternal ratings of behavior problems as indexed by the Internalizing and Externalizing scales of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Cross-gender behavior was assessed by two items from the CBCL: "behaves like opposite sex" and "wishes to be of opposite sex." As part of an ongoing longitudinal study of the Netherlands Twin Registry, mothers were asked to complete the CBCL for their twins when they were 7 (n approximately 14,000 twins) and 10 years old (n approximately 8,500 twins). The prevalence of cross-gender behavior (as measured by maternal report of behaving like or wishing to be the opposite sex) was 3.2% and 5.2% for 7-year-old boys and girls, respectively, and decreased to 2.4% and 3.3% for 10-year-old boys and girls. Surprisingly, the prevalence rate of cross-gender behavior of girls with a male co-twin was lower than of girls with a female co-twin. At both ages, the similarity for cross-gender behavior was greater in monozygotic than in dizygotic twins pairs. Genetic structural equation modeling showed that 70% of the variance in the liability of cross-gender behavior could be explained by genetic factors, at both ages and for both sexes. Cross-gender behavior was associated with higher scores on Internalizing and Externalizing problems, both in boys and in girls.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Poland 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 52 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 26%
Student > Master 8 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 12%
Unspecified 6 11%
Researcher 6 11%
Other 15 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 25 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 23%
Unspecified 9 16%
Social Sciences 5 9%
Computer Science 2 4%
Other 3 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2019.
All research outputs
#1,223,146
of 13,644,932 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#687
of 2,538 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,594
of 69,520 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#5
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,644,932 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,538 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 69,520 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.