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Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health After the 2015 Nepal Earthquakes: An Investigation of the Long-term Gendered Impacts of Disasters

Overview of attention for article published in Maternal & Child Health Journal, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
28 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
58 Mendeley
Title
Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health After the 2015 Nepal Earthquakes: An Investigation of the Long-term Gendered Impacts of Disasters
Published in
Maternal & Child Health Journal, July 2017
DOI 10.1007/s10995-017-2350-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jan Brunson

Abstract

Introduction Natural disasters in resource-poor countries have differential effects on socially disadvantaged groups such as women. In addition to the acute reproductive health needs of women during the immediate response phase of a disaster, research suggests that maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) may continue to be seriously impacted for numerous months, even years, after the event. Methods This ethnographic field research investigates the impacts of the 2015 Nepal earthquakes on mothers and children under five on the 6-month anniversary of the earthquakes. Results Though families were not channeling household funds away from health care expenses for pregnant and lactating women and children under five, the findings suggest that a delayed response by the Nepali government in administering funds for rebuilding combined with an ongoing fuel crisis were negatively impacting families' abilities to provide adequate shelter, warmth, cooking gas, and transportation for mothers and young children. This study highlights the importance of understanding the impacts of specific social and political contexts on intra-household family finances as they relate to MNCH, not just variables related to the disaster itself. Discussion Future research and policies on MNCH during the long-term recovery period after a natural disaster such as the 2015 Nepal earthquakes therefore should take into account the social and political context as well as institute multiple periodic assessments of MNCH in the first few years following the disaster.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 28 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 58 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Researcher 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 11 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 15 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 12%
Psychology 6 10%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 3%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 12 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2018.
All research outputs
#887,967
of 14,142,900 outputs
Outputs from Maternal & Child Health Journal
#90
of 1,476 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,817
of 268,069 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Maternal & Child Health Journal
#4
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,142,900 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,476 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,069 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.