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Diet and Bladder Cancer: A Case–Control Study

Overview of attention for article published in International Urology and Nephrology, June 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#36 of 654)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
facebook
1 Facebook page
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
Title
Diet and Bladder Cancer: A Case–Control Study
Published in
International Urology and Nephrology, June 2005
DOI 10.1007/s11255-004-4710-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

V. Radosavljević, S. Janković, J. Marinković, M. Dokić

Abstract

To investigate possible relationships between diet and risk for bladder cancer in Serbia, the hospital-based case-control study was carried out. This study included 130 newly diagnosed bladder cancer patients and the same number of controls matched by sex, age (%+/-%2 years) and type of residence (rural or urban). Dietary information was obtained by using a food frequency questionnaire. Initial case-control comparisons were based on tertiles of average daily intake of control group. The odds ratios (ORs) were computed for each tertile, with the lowest tertile defined as the referent category. All variables (food items) significantly related to bladder cancer were included in multivariable logistic regression analysis. According to this analysis, risk factors for bladder cancer appeared to be consumption of liver (OR=6.60, 95%CI=1.89-23.03), eggs (OR=3.12, 95%CI=1.10-8.80), pork (OR=2.99, 95%CI=1.16-7.72), and pickled vegetable (OR=3.25, 95%CI=1.36-7.71). A protective effect was found for dietary intake of kale (OR=0.21, 95%CI=0.06-0.73), cereals (OR=0.19, 95%CI=0.06-0.62), tangerines (OR=0.21, 95%CI=0.07-0.68), cabbage (OR=0.27, 95% CI=0.11-0.68), and carrots (OR=0.15, 95%CI=0.05-0.41). The study indicated a potentially important role for dietary fat and pickled vegetables in bladder carcinogenesis. An inverse association was recorded between consumption of fruits, vegetables and cereals, and the development of bladder cancer.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 7%
Unknown 14 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 4 27%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 27%
Student > Master 4 27%
Other 1 7%
Student > Bachelor 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 47%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 33%
Unspecified 1 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Engineering 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,678,608
of 11,857,470 outputs
Outputs from International Urology and Nephrology
#36
of 654 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,531
of 188,849 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Urology and Nephrology
#1
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,857,470 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 654 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,849 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.