↓ Skip to main content

Premenopausal dietary fat in relation to pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, April 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
44 Mendeley
Title
Premenopausal dietary fat in relation to pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer
Published in
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, April 2014
DOI 10.1007/s10549-014-2895-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maryam S. Farvid, Eunyoung Cho, Wendy Y. Chen, A. Heather Eliassen, Walter C. Willett

Abstract

We examined the association between fat intake and breast cancer incidence in the Nurses' Health Study II. We followed 88,804 women aged 26-45 years from 1991 to 2011 and documented incident breast cancers. Dietary fat, assessed by questionnaires in 1991, was examined in relation to total, premenopausal, and postmenopausal breast cancers. Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risk (RR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI). During 20 years of follow-up, 2,830 incident invasive breast cancer cases were diagnosed. Total fat intake was not associated with risk of breast cancer overall. After adjustment for demographic, anthropometric, lifestyle, and dietary factors, a positive association was observed between animal fat intake and breast cancer overall (RR for highest vs lowest quintile, 1.18; 95 % CI 1.04-1.33; P trend = 0.01). A positive association with animal fat intake was also seen among premenopausal women, but not among postmenopausal women. Higher intakes of saturated fat and monounsaturated fat were each associated with modestly higher breast cancer risk among all women, and higher cholesterol intake was associated with higher premenopausal breast cancer risk. However, the associations of saturated fat, monounsaturated fat and animal fat, were attenuated and non-significant after adjustment for red meat intake. Intakes of other types of fat including vegetable fat, dairy fat, polyunsaturated fat, and trans fat were not associated with breast cancer risk. Our finding suggests a positive association between early adult intake of animal fat and breast cancer risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 42 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 16%
Researcher 5 11%
Unspecified 5 11%
Other 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 20%
Unspecified 6 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Other 4 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 February 2015.
All research outputs
#1,778,463
of 12,334,049 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
#366
of 3,102 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,796
of 198,601 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
#13
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,334,049 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,102 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 198,601 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.