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Blood, Urine, and Sweat (BUS) Study: Monitoring and Elimination of Bioaccumulated Toxic Elements

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology, November 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 1,682)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
22 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
video
4 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
55 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
112 Mendeley
Title
Blood, Urine, and Sweat (BUS) Study: Monitoring and Elimination of Bioaccumulated Toxic Elements
Published in
Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology, November 2010
DOI 10.1007/s00244-010-9611-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephen J. Genuis, Detlef Birkholz, Ilia Rodushkin, Sanjay Beesoon

Abstract

There is limited understanding of the toxicokinetics of bioaccumulated toxic elements and their methods of excretion from the human body. This study was designed to assess the concentration of various toxic elements in three body fluids: blood, urine and sweat. Blood, urine, and sweat were collected from 20 individuals (10 healthy participants and 10 participants with various health problems) and analyzed for approximately 120 various compounds, including toxic elements. Toxic elements were found to differing degrees in each of blood, urine, and sweat. Serum levels for most metals and metalloids were comparable with those found in other studies in the scientific literature. Many toxic elements appeared to be preferentially excreted through sweat. Presumably stored in tissues, some toxic elements readily identified in the perspiration of some participants were not found in their serum. Induced sweating appears to be a potential method for elimination of many toxic elements from the human body. Biomonitoring for toxic elements through blood and/or urine testing may underestimate the total body burden of such toxicants. Sweat analysis should be considered as an additional method for monitoring bioaccumulation of toxic elements in humans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Australia 2 2%
Sweden 1 <1%
Unknown 106 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 25 22%
Student > Master 19 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 12%
Researcher 12 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 11%
Other 23 21%
Unknown 8 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 13%
Chemistry 10 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 6%
Other 28 25%
Unknown 13 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 114. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2019.
All research outputs
#144,549
of 13,995,172 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology
#3
of 1,682 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,127
of 191,319 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,995,172 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,682 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 191,319 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them