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Biological effects of citalopram in a suspended sediment-water system on Daphnia magna

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Pollution Research, July 2017
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1 tweeter

Citations

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10 Mendeley
Title
Biological effects of citalopram in a suspended sediment-water system on Daphnia magna
Published in
Environmental Science & Pollution Research, July 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11356-017-9763-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yang, Haohan, Lu, Guanghua, Yan, Zhenhua, Liu, Jianchao, Ma, Binni, Dong, Huike, Haohan Yang, Guanghua Lu, Zhenhua Yan, Jianchao Liu, Binni Ma, Huike Dong

Abstract

Suspended sediment (SPS) plays an important role in the aquatic ecosystems. Selective serotonin uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly used antidepressants and are frequently detected in aquatic environments. However, the biological effects of SSRIs in the presence of SPS are not well understood. To fill this gap, an SPS-water system was constructed to investigate the effects of citalopram (CIT) on Daphnia magna in the presence of SPS with different concentrations (0.1, 0.5, 1 g l(-1)) and organic carbon contents (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2%). A dialysis bag was applied in the exposure system to control the same dissolved concentration of CIT and prevent SPS from entering into the bag. The dissolved CIT concentration obviously decreased in the SPS-water system during the exposure period. The presence of SPS significantly increased the immobilization of D. magna, and the immobilization rates were positively correlated with the SPS concentration and negatively correlated with the organic carbon content in SPS. For a single exposure, CIT significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in D. magna, while SPS itself did not change the SOD and AChE activities. In the SPS-water system, SOD activity was significantly suppressed, indicating that the SPS-CIT combination could result in oxidative damage. However, SPS did not enhance the neurotoxicity of D. magna that was induced by CIT. These results suggest that SPS exerts a vital role on the biological effects of CIT and the contaminants sorbed on SPS should be taken into consideration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 20%
Professor 1 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 10%
Lecturer 1 10%
Researcher 1 10%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 40%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 4 40%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 10%
Materials Science 1 10%
Unknown 4 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 July 2017.
All research outputs
#9,213,770
of 11,511,689 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#1,441
of 2,925 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,372
of 262,616 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#68
of 158 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,511,689 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,925 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,616 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 158 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.