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The value of physical performance measurements alongside assessment of sarcopenia in predicting receipt and completion of planned treatment in non-small cell lung cancer: an observational exploratory…

Overview of attention for article published in Supportive Care in Cancer, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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25 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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35 Mendeley
Title
The value of physical performance measurements alongside assessment of sarcopenia in predicting receipt and completion of planned treatment in non-small cell lung cancer: an observational exploratory study
Published in
Supportive Care in Cancer, July 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-3821-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jemima T. Collins, Simon Noble, John Chester, Helen E. Davies, William D. Evans, Daniel Farewell, Jason F. Lester, Diane Parry, Rebecca Pettit, Anthony Byrne

Abstract

The presence of muscle mass depletion is associated with poor outcomes and survival in cancer. Alongside muscle mass, assessment of muscle strength or physical performance is essential for the diagnosis of sarcopenia. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a prevalent form of cancer with high mortality, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) Performance Status (PS) is commonly used to assess patients' suitability for treatment. However, a significant proportion of patients with good PS are unable to complete multidisciplinary team (MDT)-planned treatment. Little is known about the ability of objective measurements of physical performance in predicting patients' ability to complete MDT-planned treatment and outcomes in NSCLC. We sought to establish whether physical performance, utilising the short physical performance battery (SPPB), alongside muscle mass measurements, was able to predict receipt and completion of MDT-planned treatment, with a focus on chemotherapy in NSCLC. Participants with NSCLC treated through a single lung cancer MDT and ECOG PS 0-2 were recruited and the following assessed: body composition [bioelectrical impedance (BIA) and whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in a subset], physical performance (SPPB), PS and nutritional status. We recorded receipt and completion of chemotherapy, as well as any adverse effects, hospitalisations, and treatment delays. We included a total of 62 participants with NSCLC, and in 26 of these, the MDT-planned treatment was chemotherapy. Participants with earlier stage disease and weight loss of <10% were more likely to complete MDT-planned treatment (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05). Patients with a higher total SPPB score were more likely to complete more cycles of chemotherapy as well as the full course. Quicker gait speeds and sit-to-stand times were associated with completion of three or more cycles of chemotherapy (all p < 0.05). For every unit increase in SPPB score, there was a 28.2% decrease in adverse events, hospitalisations and delays of chemotherapy (incidence rate ratio 0.718, p = 0.001), whilst ECOG PS showed no correlation with these outcomes. Assessing physical performance by SPPB is quick and simple to do in clinical settings and may give better indication of likely chemotherapy treatment course completion than muscle mass alone and ECOG PS. In turn, this may identify specific targets for early functional intervention and impact on MDT decision-making and prudent use of resources.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 26%
Unspecified 8 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 23%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Researcher 2 6%
Other 6 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 43%
Unspecified 10 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 17%
Physics and Astronomy 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2018.
All research outputs
#979,487
of 13,110,606 outputs
Outputs from Supportive Care in Cancer
#157
of 2,573 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,873
of 264,246 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Supportive Care in Cancer
#9
of 69 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,110,606 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,573 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,246 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.