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Health-Related Quality-of-Life after Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery with or Without Closure of the Mesenteric Defects: a Post-hoc Analysis of Data from a Randomized Clinical Trial

Overview of attention for article published in Obesity Surgery, July 2017
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Title
Health-Related Quality-of-Life after Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery with or Without Closure of the Mesenteric Defects: a Post-hoc Analysis of Data from a Randomized Clinical Trial
Published in
Obesity Surgery, July 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11695-017-2798-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erik Stenberg, Eva Szabo, Johan Ottosson, Anders Thorell, Ingmar Näslund

Abstract

Mesenteric defect closure in laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery has been reported to reduce the risk for small bowel obstruction. Little is known, however, about the effect of mesenteric defect closure on patient-reported outcome. The aim of the present study was to see if mesenteric defect closure affects health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) after laparoscopic gastric bypass. Patients operated at 12 centers for bariatric surgery participated in this randomized two-arm parallel study. During the operation, patients were randomized to closure of the mesenteric defects or non-closure. This study was a post-hoc analysis comparing HRQoL of the two groups before surgery, at 1 and 2 years after the operation. HRQoL was estimated using the short form 36 (SF-36-RAND) and the obesity problems (OP) scale. Between May 1, 2010, and November 14, 2011, 2507 patients were included in the study and randomly assigned to mesenteric defect closure (n = 1259) or non-closure (n = 1248). In total, 1619 patients (64.6%) reported on their HRQoL at the 2-year follow-up. Mesenteric defect closure was associated with slightly higher rating of social functioning (87 ± 22.1 vs. 85 ± 24.2, p = 0.047) and role emotional (85 ± 31.5 vs. 82 ± 35.0, p = 0.027). No difference was seen on the OP scale (open defects 22 ± 24.8 vs. closed defects 20 ± 23.8, p = 0.125). When comparing mesenteric defect closure with non-closure, there is no clinically relevant difference in HRQoL after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 32%
Student > Master 4 21%
Unspecified 3 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Other 3 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 8 42%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 37%
Psychology 2 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2017.
All research outputs
#7,154,130
of 11,483,620 outputs
Outputs from Obesity Surgery
#1,044
of 1,966 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,018
of 261,066 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Obesity Surgery
#42
of 71 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,483,620 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,966 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,066 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 71 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.