↓ Skip to main content

Different growth sensitivity to climate of the conifer Juniperus thurifera on both sides of the Mediterranean Sea

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Biometeorology, March 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
Title
Different growth sensitivity to climate of the conifer Juniperus thurifera on both sides of the Mediterranean Sea
Published in
International Journal of Biometeorology, March 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00484-014-0811-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lucía DeSoto, Filipa Varino, José P. Andrade, Celia M. Gouveia, Filipe Campelo, Ricardo M. Trigo, Cristina Nabais

Abstract

Mediterranean plants cope with cold wet winters and dry hot summers, with a drought gradient from northwest to southeast. Limiting climatic conditions have become more pronounced in the last decades due to the warming trend and rainfall decrease. Juniperus thurifera L., a long-lived conifer tree endemic to the western Mediterranean region, has a disjunct distribution in Europe and Africa, making it a suitable species to study sensitivity to climate in both sides of the Mediterranean Basin. Tree-ring width chronologies were built for three J. thurifera stands at Spain (Europe) and three in Morocco (Africa) and correlated with monthly temperature and precipitation. The temporal stability of climate-growth relationships was assessed using moving correlations; the drought effect on growth was calculated using the monthly standardized precipitation-evapotranspiration index (SPEI) at different temporal scales. In the wettest stands, increasing spring temperature and summer precipitation enhanced growth, while in the driest stands, growth was enhanced by higher spring precipitation and lower summer temperature. The climate-growth correlations shifted during the twentieth century, especially since the 1970s. Particularly noticeable is the recent negative correlation with previous autumn and winter precipitation in the wettest stands of J. thurifera, probably related with an effect of cloud cover or flooding on carbon storage depletion for next year growth. The driest stands were affected by drought at long time scales, while the wettest stands respond to drought at short time scales. This reveals a different strategy to cope with drought conditions, with populations from drier sites able to cope with short periods of water deficit.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
Switzerland 1 3%
Italy 1 3%
Unknown 31 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 35%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Student > Master 3 9%
Unspecified 3 9%
Other 7 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 41%
Environmental Science 7 21%
Unspecified 7 21%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Other 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 April 2014.
All research outputs
#1,751,652
of 12,223,436 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Biometeorology
#227
of 752 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,549
of 197,581 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Biometeorology
#10
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,223,436 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 752 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 197,581 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.