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CD109 Mediates Cell Survival in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

Overview of attention for article published in Digestive Diseases & Sciences, April 2016
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Title
CD109 Mediates Cell Survival in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells
Published in
Digestive Diseases & Sciences, April 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10620-016-4149-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Guijuan Zong, Zhiwei Xu, Shusen Zhang, Yifen Shen, Huiyuan Qiu, Guizhou Zhu, Song He, Tao, Xudong Chen

Abstract

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for 75-80 % of primary liver cancer, and usually arises after years of liver disease. Thus it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms which drive or mediate the development of HCC. In this work, we examined whether CD109 was associated with a poor prognosis in HCC and explored possible underlying mechanisms. We examined the CD109 and Ki67 expression levels in 97 patients with HCC using immunohistochemistry. CD109 levels in HCC cells were down-regulated by shRNA transfection. The cycle progression and cell proliferation status of HCC cells were evaluated by flow cytometry and CCK-8 assay. The effect of CD109 on proliferation and apoptosis was investigated by western blot and TUNEL activity assays. The CD109 protein was up-regulated in HCC tissue compared with adjacent noncancerous tissue. CD109 expression levels in the 97 patients with HCC were positively correlated with histological grade. Univariate and multivariate survival analysis revealed that CD109 was a significant predictor of overall survival among HCC patients. CD109 shRNA knockdown delayed the G1-S phase transition, abrogated cell proliferation, and increased cell apoptosis. Furthermore, CD109 impaired TGF-β/Smad signaling through control of p-smad2. CD109 promoted HCC proliferation and predicted poor prognosis. In addition, CD109 expression was associated with anti-apoptosis in HCC cells.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 50%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 25%
Unspecified 1 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 2 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2017.
All research outputs
#10,174,485
of 11,467,888 outputs
Outputs from Digestive Diseases & Sciences
#1,915
of 2,250 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,879
of 258,999 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Digestive Diseases & Sciences
#31
of 34 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 2,250 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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