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Is it only the regulatory status? Broadening the debate on cisgenic plants

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Sciences Europe, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)

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5 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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11 Dimensions

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35 Mendeley
Title
Is it only the regulatory status? Broadening the debate on cisgenic plants
Published in
Environmental Sciences Europe, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12302-017-0120-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lilian van Hove, Frøydis Gillund

Abstract

In current debates on emerging technologies for plant breeding in Europe, much attention has been given to the regulatory status of these techniques and their public acceptance. At present, both genetically modified plants with cisgenic approaches-using genes from crossable species-as well as transgenic approaches-using genes from different species-fall under GMO regulation in the EU and both are mandatorily labelled as GMOs. Researchers involved in the early development of cisgenic GM plants convey the message that the potential use and acceptance of cisgenic approaches will be seriously hindered if GMO regulations are not adjusted. Although the similar treatment and labelling of transgenic and cisgenic plants may be a legitimate concern for the marketability of a cisgenic GM plant, there are concerns around their commercialization that reach beyond the current focus on (de)regulation. In this paper, we will use the development of the cisgenic GM potato that aims to overcome 'late blight'-the most devastating potato disease worldwide-as a case to argue that it is important to recognize, reflect and respond to broader concerns than the dominant focus on the regulatory 'burden' and consumer acceptance. Based on insights we gained from discussing this case with diverse stakeholders within the agricultural sector and potato production in Norway during a series of workshops, we elaborate on additional issues such as the (technical) solution offered; different understandings of the late blight problem; the durability of the potato plant resistance; and patenting and ownership. Hence, this paper contributes to empirical knowledge on stakeholder perspectives on emerging plant breeding technologies, underscoring the importance to broaden the scope of the debate on the opportunities and challenges of agricultural biotechnologies, such as cisgenic GM plants. The paper offers policy-relevant input to ongoing efforts to broaden the scope of risk assessments of agricultural biotechnologies. We aim to contribute to the recognition of the complex socio-ecological, legal and political dimensions in which these technological developments are entangled as a means to acknowledge, discuss and respond to these concerns and thereby contribute to more comprehensive and responsible developments within agricultural biotechnology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 37%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 9%
Professor 1 3%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 5 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 31%
Social Sciences 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Computer Science 1 3%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 10 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 June 2018.
All research outputs
#4,183,085
of 15,499,173 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Sciences Europe
#94
of 342 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,274
of 267,495 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Sciences Europe
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,499,173 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 342 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,495 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them