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Physiological and molecular responses of the earthworm Eisenia fetida to polychlorinated biphenyl contamination in soil

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Pollution Research, June 2017
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Title
Physiological and molecular responses of the earthworm Eisenia fetida to polychlorinated biphenyl contamination in soil
Published in
Environmental Science & Pollution Research, June 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11356-017-9383-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xiaochen Duan, Xiuyong Fu, Jing Song, Huixin Li, Mingming Sun, Feng Hu, Li Xu, Jiaguo Jiao

Abstract

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of man-made organic compounds ubiquitously present in the biosphere. In this study, we evaluated the toxic effects of different concentrations of PCBs in two natural soils (i.e. red soil and fluvo-aquic soil) on the earthworm Eisenia fetida. The parameters investigated included anti-oxidative response, genotoxic potential, weight variation and biochemical responses of the earthworm exposed to two different types of soils spiked with PCBs after 7 or 14 days of exposure. Earthworms had significantly lower weights in both soils after PCB exposure. PCBs significantly increased catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and guaiacol peroxidase (POD) activity in earthworms exposed to either soil type for 7 or 14 days and decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content in earthworms exposed to red soil for 14 days. Of the enzymes examined, SOD activity was the most sensitive to PCB stress. In addition, PCB exposure triggered dose-dependent coelomocyte DNA damage, even at the lowest concentration tested. This response was relatively stable between different soils. Three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that the weight variation, anti-oxidant enzyme activities, and MDA contents were significantly correlated with exposure concentration or exposure duration (P < 0.01). Furthermore, weight variation, CAT activity, and SOD activity were significantly affected by soil type (P < 0.01). Therefore, the soil type and exposure time influence the toxic effects of PCBs, and these factors should be considered when selecting responsive biomarkers.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 1 20%
Professor 1 20%
Student > Master 1 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 20%
Unspecified 1 20%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 60%
Unspecified 1 20%
Environmental Science 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 June 2017.
All research outputs
#10,122,462
of 11,415,522 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#1,879
of 2,881 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#219,982
of 262,854 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#116
of 185 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,415,522 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,881 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 185 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.