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H2O2 as a candidate bottleneck for MnP activity during cultivation of Agaricus bisporus in compost

Overview of attention for article published in AMB Express, June 2017
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32 Mendeley
Title
H2O2 as a candidate bottleneck for MnP activity during cultivation of Agaricus bisporus in compost
Published in
AMB Express, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13568-017-0424-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aurin M. Vos, Edita Jurak, Jordi F. Pelkmans, Koen Herman, Gill Pels, Johan J. Baars, Ed Hendrix, Mirjam A. Kabel, Luis G. Lugones, Han A. B. Wösten

Abstract

Degradation of lignin by fungi enhances availability of cellulose and hemicellulose in plant waste and thereby increases the amount of carbon source available to these microorganisms. The button mushroom Agaricus bisporus degrades only about half of the lignin in compost and about 40% of the carbohydrates remain unutilized during mushroom cultivation. Here it was assessed whether over-expression of the manganese peroxidase gene mnp1 improves lignin degradation and, as a consequence, carbohydrate breakdown by A. bisporus. Transformants expressing mnp1 under the control of actin regulatory sequences produced MnP activity in malt extract medium, while the parental strain A15 did not. MnP activity was increased 0.3- and 3-fold at casing and after the 2nd flush of a semi-commercial cultivation, respectively, when compared to strain A15. Pyrolysis-GC-MS showed that overexpression of MnP decreased phenylmethane and phenylethane type lignin relative to the phenylpropane type after the 2nd flush. However, it neither affected the syringyl/guaiacyl derived residue ratio nor the ratio of oxidized to non-oxidized lignin residues. Moreover, the carbohydrate content and accessibility was not affected in compost. Notably, the capacity of compost extract to consume the MnP co-factor H2O2 was 4- to 8-fold higher than its production. This may well explain why over-expression of mnp1 did not improve carbohydrate degradation in compost. In fact, availability of H2O2 may limit lignin degradation by wild-type A. bisporus.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 28%
Researcher 7 22%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 3 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Student > Master 3 9%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 41%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 19%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Unspecified 1 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 June 2017.
All research outputs
#7,084,325
of 11,374,668 outputs
Outputs from AMB Express
#283
of 659 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,951
of 264,544 outputs
Outputs of similar age from AMB Express
#37
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,374,668 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 659 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,544 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.