↓ Skip to main content

Physical activity, black carbon exposure, and DNA methylation in the FOXP3 promoter

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, June 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
Title
Physical activity, black carbon exposure, and DNA methylation in the FOXP3 promoter
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13148-017-0364-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephanie Lovinsky-Desir, Kyung Hwa Jung, Jacqueline R. Jezioro, David Z. Torrone, Mariangels de Planell-Saguer, Beizhan Yan, Frederica P. Perera, Andrew G. Rundle, Matthew S. Perzanowski, Steven N. Chillrud, Rachel L. Miller, Stephanie Lovinsky-Desir, Kyung Hwa Jung, Jacqueline R. Jezioro, David Z. Torrone, Mariangels de Planell-Saguer, Beizhan Yan, Frederica P. Perera, Andrew G. Rundle, Matthew S. Perzanowski, Steven N. Chillrud, Rachel L. Miller

Abstract

Physical activity is associated with improvement in lung function; however, pollution exposure during physical activity can lead to a transient reduction in lung function. This paradoxical relationship may be linked to altered T regulatory (Treg) cell activity, which increases with exercise and suppresses airway inflammation, but decreases in association with exposure to air pollution. To clarify these relationships, we investigated buccal cell DNA methylation of the forkhead box p3 (FOXP3) gene promoter, a proposed biomarker of Treg activity. We hypothesized that active urban children would have lower FOXP3 promoter methylation, associated with better lung function compared to non-active children. We also hypothesized that this relationship would be attenuated by high exposure to the air pollutant black carbon (BC). We performed a cross-sectional study of 135 children ages 9-14 who live in New York City. Activity was measured across 6 days. BC exposure was assessed by personal monitors worn for two 24-h periods, followed by lung function assessment. Buccal swabs were collected for DNA methylation analysis of three regions (six CpG sites) in the FOXP3 promoter. In multivariable regression models, overall, there was no significant relationship between physical activity and FOXP3 promoter methylation (p > 0.05). However, in stratified analyses, among children with higher BC exposure (≥1200 ng/m(3)), physical activity was associated with 2.37% lower methylation in promoter 2 (CpGs -77, -65, and -58) (βestimate = -2.37%, p < 0.01) but not among those with lower BC exposure (βestimate = 0.54%, p > 0.05). Differences across strata were statistically significant (pinteraction = 0.04). Among all children, after controlling for BC concentration, promoter 2 methylation was associated with reduced FEV1/FVC (βestimate = -0.40%, p < 0.01) and reduced FEF25-75% (βestimate = -1.46%, p < 0.01). Physical activity in urban children appeared associated with lower FOXP3 promoter methylation, a possible indicator of greater Treg function, under conditions of high BC exposure. Reduced FOXP3 promoter methylation was associated with higher lung function. These findings suggest that physical activity may induce immunologic benefits, particularly for urban children with greater risk of impaired lung function due to exposure to higher air pollution. FOXP3 promoter buccal cell methylation may function as a useful biomarker of that benefit.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 8 19%
Student > Master 7 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 17%
Researcher 6 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 11 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 12 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Other 8 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2017.
All research outputs
#10,080,078
of 11,364,689 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#473
of 519 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#222,892
of 267,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#19
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,364,689 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 519 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,224 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.