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The reality of scientific research in Latin America; an insider’s perspective

Overview of attention for article published in Cell Stress and Chaperones, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 437)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
132 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
8 Mendeley
Title
The reality of scientific research in Latin America; an insider’s perspective
Published in
Cell Stress and Chaperones, June 2017
DOI 10.1007/s12192-017-0815-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel R. Ciocca, Gabriela Delgado

Abstract

There is tremendous disparity in scientific productivity among nations, particularly in Latin America. At first sight, this could be linked to the relative economic health of the different countries of the region, but even large and relatively rich Latin American countries do not produce a good level of science. Although Latin America has increased the number of its scientists and research institutions in recent years, the gap between developed countries and Latin American countries is startling. The prime importance of science and technology to the development of a nation remains unacknowledged. The major factors contributing to low scientific productivity are the limited access to grant opportunities, inadequate budgets, substandard levels of laboratory infrastructure and equipment, the high cost and limited supply of reagents, and inadequate salaries and personal insecurity of scientists. The political and economic instability in several Latin America countries results in a lack of long-term goals that are essential to the development of science. In Latin America, science is not an engine of the economy. Most equipment and supplies are imported, and national industries are not given the incentives to produce these goods at home. It is a pity that Latin American society has become accustomed to expect new science and technological developments to come from developed countries rather than from their own scientists. In this article, we present a critical view of the Latin American investigator's daily life, particularly in the area of biomedicine. Too many bright young minds continue to leave Latin America for developed countries, where they are very successful. However, we still have many enthusiastic young graduates who want to make a career in science and contribute to society. Governments need to improve the status of science for the sake of these young graduates who represent the intellectual and economic future of their countries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 132 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 13%
Unknown 7 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 138%
Student > Master 9 113%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 50%
Librarian 4 50%
Student > Postgraduate 2 25%
Other 7 88%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 100%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 50%
Arts and Humanities 4 50%
Unspecified 4 50%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 38%
Other 14 175%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 102. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 April 2019.
All research outputs
#151,205
of 13,292,183 outputs
Outputs from Cell Stress and Chaperones
#1
of 437 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,684
of 267,705 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell Stress and Chaperones
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,292,183 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 437 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,705 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them