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Identification of the transcripts associated with spontaneous HCV clearance in individuals co-infected with HIV and HCV

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2016
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Title
Identification of the transcripts associated with spontaneous HCV clearance in individuals co-infected with HIV and HCV
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-2044-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yue Chen, Chengli Shen, Debjani Guha, Ming Ding, Scott Kulich, Aiymkul Ashimkhanova, Charles Rinaldo, Eric Seaberg, Joseph B. Margolick, Valentina Stosor, Otoniel Martínez-Maza, Phalguni Gupta

Abstract

Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) influences the outcome and natural disease progression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. While the majority of HCV mono-infected and HCV/HIV co-infected subjects develop chronic HCV infection, 20-46% of mono- and co-infected subjects spontaneously clear HCV infection. The mechanism underlying viral clearance is not clearly understood. Analysis of differential cellular gene expression (mRNA) between HIV-infected patients with persistent HCV infection or spontaneous clearance could provide a unique opportunity to decipher the mechanism of HCV clearance. Plasma RNA from HIV/HCV co-infected subjects who cleared HCV and those who remained chronically infected with HCV was sequenced using Ion Torrent technology. The sequencing results were analyzed to identify transcripts that are associated with HCV clearance by measuring differential gene expression in HIV/HCV co-infected subjects who cleared HCV and those who remained chronically infected with HCV. We have identified plasma mRNA, the levels of which are significantly elevated (at least 5 fold, False Discovery Rate (FDR) <0.05) before HCV infection in subjects who cleared HCV compared to those who remained chronically infected. Upon further analysis of these differentially expressed genes, before and after HCV infection, we found that before HCV infection 12 genes were uniquely upregulated in the clearance group compared to the chronically infected group. Importantly, a number of these 12 genes and their upstream regulators (such as CCL3, IL17D, LBP, SOCS3, NFKBIL1, IRF) are associated with innate immune response functions. These results suggest that subjects who spontaneously clear HCV may express these unique genes associated with innate immune functions.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 9 43%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 19%
Unspecified 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Researcher 2 10%
Other 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 43%
Unspecified 6 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Other 1 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 June 2017.
All research outputs
#10,051,348
of 11,332,694 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,721
of 4,209 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#222,835
of 267,219 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#77
of 106 outputs
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