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Correspondence between negative symptoms and potential sources of secondary negative symptoms over time

Overview of attention for article published in European Archives of Psychiatry & Clinical Neuroscience, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
50 Mendeley
Title
Correspondence between negative symptoms and potential sources of secondary negative symptoms over time
Published in
European Archives of Psychiatry & Clinical Neuroscience, June 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00406-017-0813-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aida Farreny, Mark Savill, Stefan Priebe

Abstract

There has been a debate in the literature about the distinction between primary and secondary negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Our aim was to study the associations between negative symptoms and potential sources of secondary negative symptoms over time. A sample of 275 participants with at least mid-moderate negative symptoms was randomized into body psychotherapy or Pilates class in a previous study. No significant differences were found between groups over time and changes in the symptom domains were modest. The present investigation considers the longitudinal correlation between variables of interest at baseline, 3 and 9 months follow-up. Measures were the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS), the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS), the Calgary Depression Scale (CDSS) and the Simpson-Angus Extrapyramidal side-effects Scale (SAS). Mixed models were computed to test the longitudinal association between these variables. In a sensitivity analysis, the dosages of antipsychotic, illness duration and allocated intervention were taken into account. Overall, the course of extrapyramidal side-effects, depressive and positive symptoms was significantly related to the course of negative symptoms. Only extrapyramidal effects were longitudinally correlated to expressive negative symptoms. The sensitivity analyses showed unaltered results for positive symptoms and depression but a lack of association between extrapyramidal effects and the CAINS outcomes. In conclusion, the unambiguous interpretation between primary and secondary negative symptoms may lead to refined treatment approaches for schizophrenia and to increased effects of the interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 20%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 13 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 16%
Psychology 7 14%
Sports and Recreations 4 8%
Unspecified 1 2%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 16 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 September 2019.
All research outputs
#3,796,543
of 14,414,290 outputs
Outputs from European Archives of Psychiatry & Clinical Neuroscience
#200
of 819 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,702
of 269,559 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Archives of Psychiatry & Clinical Neuroscience
#3
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,414,290 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 819 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,559 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.