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Dyadic interdependence of psychosocial outcomes among haematological cancer survivors and their support persons

Overview of attention for article published in Supportive Care in Cancer, May 2017
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7 Mendeley
Title
Dyadic interdependence of psychosocial outcomes among haematological cancer survivors and their support persons
Published in
Supportive Care in Cancer, May 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-3751-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christine Paul, Alix Hall, Christopher Oldmeadow, Marita Lynagh, Sharon Campbell, Ken Bradstock, Anna Williamson, Mariko Carey, Rob Sanson-Fisher

Abstract

This study aimed to explore the dyadic relationships between unmet need, depression, and anxiety in people diagnosed with haematological cancer and their support persons. Adult survivors (18 years+) who had been diagnosed with a haematological cancer were recruited to a cross-sectional mailed survey via five state cancer registries in Australia. Participating survivors invited a support person to also complete a survey. Structural equation modelling was used to explore the relationships among survivor and support person self-reported depression, anxiety, and unmet needs. Of the 4299 eligible haematological cancer survivors contacted by the registries, 1511 (35%) returned a completed survey as did 1004 support persons. There were 787 dyads with complete data. After adjusting for age, gender, rurality, cancer type, and whether the support person was a relative, positive correlations were found between survivor and support person scores for depression (p = 0.0029) and unmet needs (p < 0.001), but not anxiety scores (p = 0.075). Survivor unmet needs were significantly related to support person depression (p = 0.0036). Support person unmet needs were significantly related to a higher depression score for survivors (p = 0.0067). Greater support person unmet needs were significantly related to a higher anxiety score for survivors (p = 0.0083). Survivor unmet needs did not have a significant relationship to support person anxiety (p = 0.78). Unmet needs may mediate the interdependence of psychosocial experiences for survivors and support persons, although a longitudinal study is required to confirm causality. Addressing unmet needs may be a potential target for improving outcomes for both groups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 29%
Student > Master 2 29%
Student > Postgraduate 1 14%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 14%
Librarian 1 14%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 29%
Psychology 1 14%
Unspecified 1 14%
Engineering 1 14%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 August 2017.
All research outputs
#8,913,271
of 11,595,461 outputs
Outputs from Supportive Care in Cancer
#1,654
of 2,218 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#176,379
of 268,876 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Supportive Care in Cancer
#53
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,595,461 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,218 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,876 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.