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Risky Business: Risk Perception and the Use of Medical Services among Customers of DTC Personal Genetic Testing

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Genetic Counseling, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 210)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
102 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
149 Mendeley
Title
Risky Business: Risk Perception and the Use of Medical Services among Customers of DTC Personal Genetic Testing
Published in
Journal of Genetic Counseling, January 2012
DOI 10.1007/s10897-012-9483-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

David J. Kaufman, Juli M. Bollinger, Rachel L. Dvoskin, Joan A. Scott

Abstract

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing has generated speculation about how customers will interpret results and how these interpretations will influence healthcare use and behavior; however, few empirical data on these topics exist. We conducted an online survey of DTC customers of 23andMe, deCODEme, and Navigenics to begin to address these questions. Random samples of U.S. DTC customers were invited to participate. Survey topics included demographics, perceptions of two sample DTC results, and health behaviors following DTC testing. Of 3,167 DTC customers invited, 33% (n = 1,048) completed the survey. Forty-three percent of respondents had sought additional information about a health condition tested; 28% had discussed their results with a healthcare professional; and 9% had followed up with additional lab tests. Sixteen percent of respondents had changed a medication or supplement regimen, and one-third said they were being more careful about their diet. Many of these health-related behaviors were significantly associated with responses to a question that asked how participants would perceive their colon cancer risk (as low, moderate, or high) if they received a test result showing an 11% lifetime risk, as compared to 5% risk in the general population. Respondents who would consider themselves to be at high risk for colon cancer were significantly more likely to have sought information about a disease (p = 0.03), discussed results with a physician (p = 0.05), changed their diet (p = 0.02), and started exercising more (p = 0.01). Participants' personal health contexts--including personal and family history of disease and quality of self-perceived health--were also associated with health-related behaviors after testing. Subjective interpretations of genetic risk data and personal context appear to be related to health behaviors among DTC customers. Sharing DTC test results with healthcare professionals may add perceived utility to the tests.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 149 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Brazil 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 139 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 41 28%
Researcher 28 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 17%
Student > Bachelor 19 13%
Other 7 5%
Other 28 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 27 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 22 15%
Social Sciences 20 13%
Psychology 15 10%
Other 37 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2014.
All research outputs
#144,417
of 3,691,686 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Genetic Counseling
#4
of 210 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,697
of 110,881 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Genetic Counseling
#1
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,691,686 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 210 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 110,881 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.