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An exquisitely preserved troodontid theropod with new information on the palatal structure from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia

Overview of attention for article published in Naturwissenschaften, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
19 tweeters
facebook
9 Facebook pages
wikipedia
6 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
An exquisitely preserved troodontid theropod with new information on the palatal structure from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia
Published in
Naturwissenschaften, January 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00114-014-1143-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Takanobu Tsuihiji, Rinchen Barsbold, Mahito Watabe, Khishigjav Tsogtbaatar, Tsogtbaatar Chinzorig, Yoshito Fujiyama, Shigeru Suzuki

Abstract

Troodontidae is a clade of small-bodied theropod dinosaurs. A new troodontid, Gobivenator mongoliensis gen. et sp. nov., is described based on the most complete skeleton of a Late Cretaceous member of this clade presently known, from the Campanian Djadokhta Formation in the central Gobi Desert. G. mongoliensis is different from other troodontids in possessing a pointed anterior end of the fused parietal and a fossa on the surangular in front of the posterior surangular foramen. The skull was superbly preserved in the specimen and provides detailed information of the entire configuration of the palate in Troodontidae. Overall morphology of the palate in Gobivenator resembles those of dromaeosaurids and Archaeopteryx, showing an apparent trend of elongation of the pterygoid process of the palatine and reduction of the pterygopalatine suture toward the basal Avialae. The palatal configuration suggests that the skull of Gobivenator would have been akinetic but had already acquired prerequisites for later evolution of cranial kinesis in birds, such as the loss of the epipterygoid and reduction in contact areas among bones.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 45 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 19%
Student > Bachelor 7 15%
Student > Master 7 15%
Unspecified 4 8%
Other 11 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 24 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 33%
Unspecified 6 13%
Computer Science 1 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2018.
All research outputs
#974,752
of 13,022,627 outputs
Outputs from Naturwissenschaften
#192
of 1,459 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,384
of 240,140 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Naturwissenschaften
#5
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,022,627 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,459 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,140 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.