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Natural Genetic Variation Underlying Differences in Peromyscus Repetitive and Social/Aggressive Behaviors

Overview of attention for article published in Behavior Genetics, January 2014
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Title
Natural Genetic Variation Underlying Differences in Peromyscus Repetitive and Social/Aggressive Behaviors
Published in
Behavior Genetics, January 2014
DOI 10.1007/s10519-013-9640-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kimberly R. Shorter, Amy Owen, Vanessa Anderson, April C. Hall-South, Samantha Hayford, Patricia Cakora, Janet P. Crossland, Velina R. M. Georgi, Amy Perkins, Sandra J. Kelly, Michael R. Felder, Paul B. Vrana

Abstract

Peromyscus maniculatus (BW) and P. polionotus (PO) are interfertile North American species that differ in many characteristics. For example, PO exhibit monogamy and BW animals are susceptible to repetitive behaviors and thus a model for neurobehavioral disorders such as Autism. We analyzed these two stocks as well as their hybrids, a BW Y(PO) consomic line (previously shown to alter glucose homeostasis) and a natural P. maniculatus agouti variant (A(Nb) = wide band agouti). We show that PO animals engage in far less repetitive behavior than BW animals, that this trait is dominant, and that trait distribution in both species is bi-modal. The A(Nb) allele also reduces such behaviors, particularly in females. PO, F1, and A(Nb) animals all dig significantly more than BW. Increased self-grooming is also a PO dominant trait, and there is a bimodal trait distribution in all groups except BW. The inter-stock differences in self-grooming are greater between males, and the consomic data suggest the Y chromosome plays a role. The monogamous PO animals engage in more social behavior than BW; hybrid animals exhibit intermediate levels. Surprisingly, A(Nb) animals are also more social than BW animals, although A(Nb) interactions led to aggressive interactions at higher levels than any other group. PO animals exhibited the lowest incidence of aggressive behaviors, while the hybrids exhibited BW levels. Thus this group exhibits natural, genetically tractable variation in several biomedically relevant traits.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Poland 1 2%
Unknown 46 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 13 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 17%
Student > Master 7 15%
Researcher 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 4 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 34%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 9%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 7 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 January 2014.
All research outputs
#9,840,513
of 12,321,765 outputs
Outputs from Behavior Genetics
#548
of 674 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,914
of 220,647 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behavior Genetics
#11
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,321,765 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.