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Parents’ Expectations of High Schools in Firearm Violence Prevention

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Community Health, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#16 of 848)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
Title
Parents’ Expectations of High Schools in Firearm Violence Prevention
Published in
Journal of Community Health, May 2017
DOI 10.1007/s10900-017-0360-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erica Payton, Jagdish Khubchandani, Amy Thompson, James H. Price

Abstract

Firearm violence remains a significant problem in the US (with 2787 adolescents killed in 2015). However, the research on school firearm violence prevention practices and policies is scant. Parents are major stakeholders in relation to firearm violence by youths and school safety in general. The purpose of this study was to examine what parents thought schools should be doing to reduce the risk of firearm violence in schools. A valid and reliable questionnaire was mailed to a national random sample of 600 parents who had at least one child enrolled in a public secondary school (response rate = 47%). Parents perceived inadequate parental monitoring/rearing practices (73%), peer harassment and/or bullying (58%), inadequate mental health care services for youth (54%), and easy access to guns (51%) as major causes of firearm violence in schools. The school policies perceived to be most effective in reducing firearm violence were installing an alert system in schools (70%), working with law enforcement to design an emergency response plan (70%), creating a comprehensive security plan (68%), requiring criminal background checks for all school personnel prior to hiring (67%), and implementing an anonymous system for students to report peer concerns regarding potential violence (67%). Parents seem to have a limited grasp of potentially effective interventions to reduce firearm violence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 8 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 19%
Student > Master 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Other 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 10 31%
Unspecified 7 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 16%
Psychology 4 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Other 4 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 55. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 October 2018.
All research outputs
#319,066
of 13,617,860 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Community Health
#16
of 848 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,185
of 265,214 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Community Health
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,617,860 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 848 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,214 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them