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“Putting on My Best Normal”: Social Camouflaging in Adults with Autism Spectrum Conditions

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#30 of 2,775)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
125 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Readers on

mendeley
83 Mendeley
Title
“Putting on My Best Normal”: Social Camouflaging in Adults with Autism Spectrum Conditions
Published in
Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, May 2017
DOI 10.1007/s10803-017-3166-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura Hull, K. V. Petrides, Carrie Allison, Paula Smith, Simon Baron-Cohen, Meng-Chuan Lai, William Mandy, Hull, Laura, Petrides, K. V., Allison, Carrie, Smith, Paula, Baron-Cohen, Simon, Lai, Meng-Chuan, Mandy, William, Hull, L, Petrides, KV, Allison, C, Smith, P, Baron-Cohen, S, Lai, M-C, Mandy, W

Abstract

Camouflaging of autistic characteristics in social situations is hypothesised as a common social coping strategy for adults with autism spectrum conditions (ASC). Camouflaging may impact diagnosis, quality of life, and long-term outcomes, but little is known about it. This qualitative study examined camouflaging experiences in 92 adults with ASC, with questions focusing on the nature, motivations, and consequences of camouflaging. Thematic analysis was used to identify key elements of camouflaging, which informed development of a three-stage model of the camouflaging process. First, motivations for camouflaging included fitting in and increasing connections with others. Second, camouflaging itself comprised a combination of masking and compensation techniques. Third, short- and long-term consequences of camouflaging included exhaustion, challenging stereotypes, and threats to self-perception.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 125 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 81 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 23%
Student > Bachelor 12 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 13%
Student > Master 10 12%
Researcher 10 12%
Other 21 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 45 54%
Social Sciences 10 12%
Unspecified 9 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Other 13 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 112. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2018.
All research outputs
#94,677
of 9,723,837 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#30
of 2,775 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,784
of 262,128 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#2
of 91 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,723,837 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,775 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,128 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 91 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.