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Ultramafic geoecology of South and Southeast Asia

Overview of attention for article published in Botanical Studies, April 2017
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2 tweeters

Citations

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94 Mendeley
Title
Ultramafic geoecology of South and Southeast Asia
Published in
Botanical Studies, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40529-017-0167-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. L. Galey, A. van der Ent, M. C. M. Iqbal, N. Rajakaruna

Abstract

Globally, ultramafic outcrops are renowned for hosting floras with high levels of endemism, including plants with specialised adaptations such as nickel or manganese hyperaccumulation. Soils derived from ultramafic regoliths are generally nutrient-deficient, have major cation imbalances, and have concomitant high concentrations of potentially phytotoxic trace elements, especially nickel. The South and Southeast Asian region has the largest surface occurrences of ultramafic regoliths in the world, but the geoecology of these outcrops is still poorly studied despite severe conservation threats. Due to the paucity of systematic plant collections in many areas and the lack of georeferenced herbarium records and databased information, it is not possible to determine the distribution of species, levels of endemism, and the species most threatened. However, site-specific studies provide insights to the ultramafic geoecology of several locations in South and Southeast Asia. The geoecology of tropical ultramafic regions differs substantially from those in temperate regions in that the vegetation at lower elevations is generally tall forest with relatively low levels of endemism. On ultramafic mountaintops, where the combined forces of edaphic and climatic factors intersect, obligate ultramafic species and hyperendemics often occur. Forest clearing, agricultural development, mining, and climate change-related stressors have contributed to rapid and unprecedented loss of ultramafic-associated habitats in the region. The geoecology of the large ultramafic outcrops of Indonesia's Sulawesi, Obi and Halmahera, and many other smaller outcrops in South and Southeast Asia, remains largely unexplored, and should be prioritised for study and conservation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 1%
Unknown 93 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 18%
Student > Master 12 13%
Student > Bachelor 11 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 11%
Other 6 6%
Other 19 20%
Unknown 19 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 30%
Environmental Science 19 20%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 5%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 3%
Other 11 12%
Unknown 24 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 December 2021.
All research outputs
#14,355,517
of 21,347,849 outputs
Outputs from Botanical Studies
#67
of 158 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#173,674
of 284,896 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Botanical Studies
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,347,849 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 158 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,896 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.