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Age-related changes in 100-km ultra-marathon running performance

Overview of attention for article published in Age, July 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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87 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
68 Mendeley
Title
Age-related changes in 100-km ultra-marathon running performance
Published in
Age, July 2011
DOI 10.1007/s11357-011-9290-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Beat Knechtle, Christoph Alexander Rüst, Thomas Rosemann, Romuald Lepers

Abstract

The aims of this study were (1) to investigate the participation and performance trends at the '100 km Lauf Biel' in Switzerland from 1998 to 2010, and (2) to compare the age-related changes in 100-km running performance between males and females. For both sexes, the percent of finishers significantly (P < 0.01) decreased for the 18-29 and the 30-39-year age groups, while it significantly (P < 0.01) increased for the 40-49 and the 50-59-year age groups over the studied period. From 1998 to 2010, the mean age of the top ten finishers increased by 0.4 years per annum for both females (P = 0.02) and males (P = 0.003). The running time for the top ten finishers remained stable for females, while it significantly (P = 0.001) increased by 2.4 min per annum for males. There was a significant (P < 0.001) age effect on running times for both sexes. The best 100-km running times was observed for the age comprised between 30 and 49 years for males, and between 30 and 54 years for females, respectively. The age-related decline in running performance was similar until 60-64 years between males and females, but was greater for females compared to males after 65 years. Future studies should investigate the lifespan from 65 to 75 years to better understand the performance difference between male and female master ultra-marathoners.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Czechia 1 1%
Unknown 64 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 16%
Student > Master 10 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 15%
Researcher 9 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 10%
Other 21 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 28 41%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 9%
Unspecified 4 6%
Psychology 3 4%
Other 9 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 July 2016.
All research outputs
#2,145,215
of 12,651,890 outputs
Outputs from Age
#128
of 475 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,650
of 84,176 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Age
#5
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,651,890 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 475 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 84,176 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.