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Decomposition of regional convergence in population aging across Europe

Overview of attention for article published in Genus, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 125)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
40 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
16 Mendeley
Title
Decomposition of regional convergence in population aging across Europe
Published in
Genus, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s41118-017-0018-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ilya Kashnitsky, Joop de Beer, Leo van Wissen

Abstract

In the face of rapidly aging population, decreasing regional inequalities in population composition is one of the regional cohesion goals of the European Union. To our knowledge, no explicit quantification of the changes in regional population aging differentiation exist. We investigate how regional differences in population aging developed over the last decade and how they are likely to evolve in the coming three decades, and we examine how demographic components of population growth contribute to the process. We use the beta-convergence approach to test whether regions are moving towards a common level of population aging. The change in population composition is decomposed into the separate effects of changes in the size of the non-working-age population and of the working-age population. The latter changes are further decomposed into the effects of cohort turnover, migration at working ages, and mortality at working ages. European Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS)-2 regions experienced notable convergence in population aging during the period 2003-2012 and are expected to experience further convergence in the coming three decades. Convergence in aging mainly depends on changes in the population structure of East-European regions. Cohort turnover plays the major role in promoting convergence. Differences in mortality at working ages, though quite moderate themselves, have a significant cumulative effect. The projections show that when it is assumed that net migration flows at working ages are converging across European regions, this will not contribute to convergence of population aging. The beta-convergence approach proves useful to examine regional variations in population aging across Europe.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 40 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 19%
Professor 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 13%
Unspecified 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 3 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 3 19%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 13%
Unspecified 1 6%
Environmental Science 1 6%
Computer Science 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 6 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 42. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 August 2022.
All research outputs
#786,089
of 21,817,553 outputs
Outputs from Genus
#8
of 125 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,661
of 284,363 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genus
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,817,553 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 125 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them