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ISA virus in Chile: evidence of vertical transmission

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Virology, November 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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54 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
96 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
Title
ISA virus in Chile: evidence of vertical transmission
Published in
Archives of Virology, November 2008
DOI 10.1007/s00705-008-0251-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Siri Vike, Stian Nylund, Are Nylund

Abstract

Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV), genus Isavirus (family Orthomyxoviridae), is present in all large salmon (Salmo salar)-producing countries around the North Atlantic. The target species for this virus are members of the genus Salmo, but the virus may also replicate in other salmonids introduced to the North Atlantic (Oncorhychus spp.). Existing ISA virus isolates can be divided into two major genotypes, a North American (NA) and a European (EU) genotype, based on phylogenetic analysis of the genome. The EU genotype can be subdivided into several highly supported clades based on analysis of segments 5 (fusion protein gene) and 6 (hemagglutinin-esterase gene). In 1999 an ISA virus belonging to the NA genotype was isolated from Coho salmon in Chile, and in 2007 the first outbreaks of ISA in farmed Atlantic salmon was observed. Several salmon farms in Chile were affected by the disease in 2007, and even more farms in 2008. In this study, ISA virus has been isolated from salmon in a marine farm suffering an outbreak of the disease in 2008 and from smolts with no signs of ISA in a fresh water lake. Sequencing of the partial genome of these ISA viruses, followed by phylogenetic analysis including genome sequences from members of the NA and EU genotypes, showed that the Chilean ISA virus belongs to the EU genotype. The Chilean ISA virus groups in a clade with exclusively Norwegian ISA viruses, where one of these isolates was obtained from a Norwegian brood stock population. All salmonid species in the southern hemisphere have been introduced from Europe and North America. The absence of natural hosts for ISA viruses in Chile excludes the possibility of natural reservoirs in this country, and the close relationship between contemporary ISA virus strains from farmed Atlantic salmon in Chile and Norway suggest a recent transmission from Norway to Chile. Norway export large amounts of Atlantic salmon embryos every year to Chile; hence, the best explanation for the Norwegian ISA virus in Chile is transmission via these embryos, i.e. vertical or transgenerational transmission. This supports other studies showing that the ISA virus can be transmitted vertically.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 6 6%
Canada 3 3%
United States 2 2%
Norway 2 2%
Mexico 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Colombia 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 79 82%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 33 34%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 23%
Student > Master 11 11%
Unspecified 6 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 5%
Other 19 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 56 58%
Unspecified 7 7%
Environmental Science 6 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 4%
Other 17 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 June 2014.
All research outputs
#2,013,841
of 12,222,476 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Virology
#149
of 2,846 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,909
of 89,138 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Virology
#1
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,222,476 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,846 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 89,138 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them