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A threat to a virtual hand elicits motor cortex activation

Overview of attention for article published in Experimental Brain Research, December 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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38 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
134 Mendeley
Title
A threat to a virtual hand elicits motor cortex activation
Published in
Experimental Brain Research, December 2013
DOI 10.1007/s00221-013-3800-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mar González-Franco, Tabitha C. Peck, Antoni Rodríguez-Fornells, Mel Slater

Abstract

We report an experiment where participants observed an attack on their virtual body as experienced in an immersive virtual reality (IVR) system. Participants sat by a table with their right hand resting upon it. In IVR, they saw a virtual table that was registered with the real one, and they had a virtual body that substituted their real body seen from a first person perspective. The virtual right hand was collocated with their real right hand. Event-related brain potentials were recorded in two conditions, one where the participant's virtual hand was attacked with a knife and a control condition where the knife only struck the virtual table. Significantly greater P450 potentials were obtained in the attack condition confirming our expectations that participants had a strong illusion of the virtual hand being their own, which was also strongly supported by questionnaire responses. Higher levels of subjective virtual hand ownership correlated with larger P450 amplitudes. Mu-rhythm event-related desynchronization in the motor cortex and readiness potential (C3-C4) negativity were clearly observed when the virtual hand was threatened-as would be expected, if the real hand was threatened and the participant tried to avoid harm. Our results support the idea that event-related potentials may provide a promising non-subjective measure of virtual embodiment. They also support previous experiments on pain observation and are placed into context of similar experiments and studies of body perception and body ownership within cognitive neuroscience.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 134 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 4 3%
Portugal 1 <1%
Taiwan 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 127 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 25%
Researcher 26 19%
Student > Master 20 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 11%
Unspecified 11 8%
Other 28 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 46 34%
Computer Science 25 19%
Neuroscience 18 13%
Unspecified 17 13%
Engineering 8 6%
Other 20 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2019.
All research outputs
#7,195,958
of 13,322,622 outputs
Outputs from Experimental Brain Research
#1,063
of 2,277 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,233
of 251,321 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Experimental Brain Research
#11
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,322,622 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,277 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,321 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.