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Revelation effects in remembering, forecasting, and perspective taking

Overview of attention for article published in Memory & Cognition, May 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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9 Mendeley
Title
Revelation effects in remembering, forecasting, and perspective taking
Published in
Memory & Cognition, May 2017
DOI 10.3758/s13421-017-0710-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Deanne L. Westerman, Jeremy K. Miller, Marianne E. Lloyd

Abstract

The revelation effect is a robust phenomenon in episodic memory whereby stimuli that immediately follow a simple cognitive task are more likely to garner positive responses on a variety of memory tests, including autobiographical memory judgments. Six experiments investigated the revelation effect for judgments of past and future events as well as judgments made from others' perspectives. The purpose of this work was to determine whether these subjectively distinct judgments are subject to the same decision-making biases, as might be expected if they are governed by similar processes (e.g., Schacter, Addis, & Buckner 2007). College-aged participants were asked to rate a variety of life events according to whether the events had occurred during their childhoods or would occur during the next 10 years. Events that followed an anagram task were judged as more likely to have happened in the past and more likely to occur in the future. We also showed a revelation effect when participants were asked to adopt the perspective of others when making judgments about past and future events. When the task was reworded to be non-episodic (participants judged how common the events were during childhood and adulthood), no revelation effect was found for either past or future time frames, which suggests common boundary conditions for both types of judgments. The results are consistent with studies showing strong parallels between remembering and other forms of self-projection but not with semantic memory judgments.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 33%
Other 1 11%
Student > Master 1 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 11%
Student > Postgraduate 1 11%
Other 2 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 33%
Psychology 2 22%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 11%
Arts and Humanities 1 11%
Other 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,849,674
of 11,449,413 outputs
Outputs from Memory & Cognition
#580
of 1,076 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#137,182
of 265,378 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Memory & Cognition
#9
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,449,413 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,076 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,378 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.