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Decreased hemispheric connectivity and decreased intra- and inter- hemisphere asymmetry of resting state functional network connectivity in schizophrenia

Overview of attention for article published in Brain Imaging and Behavior, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

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Citations

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30 Mendeley
Title
Decreased hemispheric connectivity and decreased intra- and inter- hemisphere asymmetry of resting state functional network connectivity in schizophrenia
Published in
Brain Imaging and Behavior, April 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11682-017-9718-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

O. Agcaoglu, R. Miller, E. Damaraju, B. Rashid, J. Bustillo, M. S. Cetin, T. G. M. Van Erp, S. McEwen, A. Preda, J. M. Ford, K. O. Lim, D. S. Manoach, D. H. Mathalon, S. G. Potkin, V. D. Calhoun

Abstract

Many studies have shown that schizophrenia patients have aberrant functional network connectivity (FNC) among brain regions, suggesting schizophrenia manifests with significantly diminished (in majority of the cases) connectivity. Schizophrenia is also associated with a lack of hemispheric lateralization. Hoptman et al. (2012) reported lower inter-hemispheric connectivity in schizophrenia patients compared to controls using voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity. In this study, we merge these two points of views together using a group independent component analysis (gICA)-based approach to generate hemisphere-specific timecourses and calculate intra-hemisphere and inter-hemisphere FNC on a resting state fMRI dataset consisting of age- and gender-balanced 151 schizophrenia patients and 163 healthy controls. We analyzed the group differences between patients and healthy controls in each type of FNC measures along with age and gender effects. The results reveal that FNC in schizophrenia patients shows less hemispheric asymmetry compared to that of the healthy controls. We also found a decrease in connectivity in all FNC types such as intra-left (L_FNC), intra-right (R_FNC) and inter-hemisphere (Inter_FNC) in the schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls, but general patterns of connectivity were preserved in patients. Analyses of age and gender effects yielded results similar to those reported in whole brain FNC studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 20%
Researcher 6 20%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Other 2 7%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 7 23%
Engineering 4 13%
Psychology 3 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Computer Science 2 7%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 10 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,191,158
of 11,500,624 outputs
Outputs from Brain Imaging and Behavior
#257
of 655 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,497
of 264,512 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brain Imaging and Behavior
#10
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,500,624 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 655 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,512 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.