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Management Options for Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Current Treatment Options in Oncology, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#33 of 267)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
Title
Management Options for Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer
Published in
Current Treatment Options in Oncology, April 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11864-017-0462-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Farhad Fakhrejahani, Ravi A. Madan, William L. Dahut

Abstract

Prostate cancer is the most common solid tumor malignancy in men worldwide. Treatment with surgery and radiation can be curative in organ-confined disease. Unfortunately, about one third of men develop biochemically recurrent disease based only on rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in the absence of visible disease on conventional imaging. For these patients with biochemical recurrent prostate cancer, there is no uniform guideline for subsequent management. Based on available data, it seems prudent that biochemical recurrent prostate cancer should initially be evaluated for salvage radiation or prostatectomy, with curative intent. In selected cases, high-intensity focused ultrasound and cryotherapy may be considered in patients that meet very narrow criteria as defined by non-randomized trials. If salvage options are not practical or unsuccessful, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a standard option for disease control. While some patients prefer ADT to manage the disease immediately, others defer treatment because of the associated toxicity. In the absence of definitive randomized data, patients may be followed using PSA doubling time as a trigger to initiate ADT. Based on retrospective data, a PSA doubling time of less than 3-6 months has been associated with near-term development of metastasis and thus could be used signal to initiate ADT. Once treatment is begun, patients and their providers can choose between an intermittent and continuous ADT strategy. The intermittent approach may limit side effects but in patients with metastatic disease studies could not exclude a 20% greater risk of death. In men with biochemical recurrence, large studies have shown that intermittent therapy is non-inferior to continuous therapy, thus making this a reasonable option. Since biochemically recurrent prostate cancer is defined by technological limitations of radiographic detection, as new imaging (i.e., PSMA) strategies are developed, it may alter how the disease is monitored and perhaps managed. Furthermore, patients have no symptoms related to their disease and thus many prefer options that minimize toxicity. For this reason, herbal agents and immunotherapy are under investigation as potential alternatives to ADT and its accompanying side effects. New therapeutic options combined with improved imaging to evaluate the disease may markedly change how biochemically recurrent prostate cancer is managed in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 26%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Student > Postgraduate 3 11%
Researcher 3 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 11%
Other 7 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 56%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 15%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 October 2017.
All research outputs
#3,276,497
of 12,059,719 outputs
Outputs from Current Treatment Options in Oncology
#33
of 267 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,516
of 266,280 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Treatment Options in Oncology
#2
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,059,719 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 267 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,280 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.