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Curcumin and Cancer Cells: How Many Ways Can Curry Kill Tumor Cells Selectively?

Overview of attention for article published in The AAPS Journal, July 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 838)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
96 tweeters
patent
5 patents
facebook
42 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
q&a
1 Q&A thread
video
5 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
412 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
393 Mendeley
Title
Curcumin and Cancer Cells: How Many Ways Can Curry Kill Tumor Cells Selectively?
Published in
The AAPS Journal, July 2009
DOI 10.1208/s12248-009-9128-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jayaraj Ravindran, Sahdeo Prasad, Bharat B. Aggarwal

Abstract

Cancer is a hyperproliferative disorder that is usually treated by chemotherapeutic agents that are toxic not only to tumor cells but also to normal cells, so these agents produce major side effects. In addition, these agents are highly expensive and thus not affordable for most. Moreover, such agents cannot be used for cancer prevention. Traditional medicines are generally free of the deleterious side effects and usually inexpensive. Curcumin, a component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), is one such agent that is safe, affordable, and efficacious. How curcumin kills tumor cells is the focus of this review. We show that curcumin modulates growth of tumor cells through regulation of multiple cell signaling pathways including cell proliferation pathway (cyclin D1, c-myc), cell survival pathway (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, cFLIP, XIAP, c-IAP1), caspase activation pathway (caspase-8, 3, 9), tumor suppressor pathway (p53, p21) death receptor pathway (DR4, DR5), mitochondrial pathways, and protein kinase pathway (JNK, Akt, and AMPK). How curcumin selectively kills tumor cells, and not normal cells, is also described in detail.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 96 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 393 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 3 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Luxembourg 1 <1%
Other 3 <1%
Unknown 377 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 83 21%
Student > Master 72 18%
Student > Bachelor 69 18%
Researcher 43 11%
Unspecified 27 7%
Other 99 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 117 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 65 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 52 13%
Chemistry 45 11%
Unspecified 43 11%
Other 71 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 131. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2018.
All research outputs
#119,983
of 13,861,952 outputs
Outputs from The AAPS Journal
#4
of 838 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#461
of 85,757 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The AAPS Journal
#1
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,861,952 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 838 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 85,757 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them