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α-Synuclein nonhuman primate models of Parkinson’s disease

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neural Transmission, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
Title
α-Synuclein nonhuman primate models of Parkinson’s disease
Published in
Journal of Neural Transmission, April 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00702-017-1720-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

David J. Marmion, Jeffrey H. Kordower

Abstract

Proper understanding of the mechanism(s) by which α-synuclein misfolds and propagates may hold the key to unraveling the complex pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. A more complete understanding of the disease itself, as well as establishing animal models that fully recapitulate pathological and functional disease progression, are needed to develop treatments that will delay, halt or reverse the disease course. Traditional neurotoxin-based animal models fail to mimic crucial aspects of Parkinson's and thus are not relevant for the study of neuroprotection and disease-modifying therapies. Therefore, a new era of animal models centered on α-synuclein has emerged with the utility of nonhuman primates in these studies beginning to become important. Indeed, disease modeling in nonhuman primates offers a more similar anatomical and genetic background to humans, and the ability to assess complex behavioral impairments that are difficult to test in rodents. Furthermore, results obtained from monkey studies translate better to applications in humans. In this review, we highlight the importance of α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease and discuss the development of α-synuclein based nonhuman primate models.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 27%
Student > Bachelor 5 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Other 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Other 6 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 10 38%
Unspecified 4 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Other 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2017.
All research outputs
#1,525,510
of 12,906,124 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neural Transmission
#92
of 1,197 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,412
of 259,905 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neural Transmission
#5
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,906,124 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,197 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,905 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.