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The Arms Trade Treaty (ATT): A public health imperative

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Public Health Policy, November 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
Title
The Arms Trade Treaty (ATT): A public health imperative
Published in
Journal of Public Health Policy, November 2013
DOI 10.1057/jphp.2013.49
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Valenti, Robert Mtonga, Robert Gould, Michael Christ

Abstract

The United Nations adopted an historic international Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) in April 2013. A 1997 meeting of Nobel Peace Prize laureates who called for an International Code of Conduct to address the 'destructive effects of the unregulated arms trade' initiated discussions that led to the Treaty. Public health institutions, including the World Health Organization and the International Committee of the Red Cross, and nongovernmental health groups such as International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, made adoption of the ATT a public health imperative. The poorly regulated $70 billion annual trade in conventional arms fuels conflict, with devastating effects on global health. The ATT aims to 'reduce human suffering'. It prohibits arms' sales if there is knowledge that the arms would be used in the commission of genocide, attacks against civilians, or war crimes. The health community has much to contribute to ensuring ratification and implementation of the ATT.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 27%
Student > Bachelor 3 27%
Unspecified 2 18%
Researcher 1 9%
Librarian 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 18%
Social Sciences 2 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 9%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 9%
Other 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 March 2015.
All research outputs
#3,391,277
of 13,608,085 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Public Health Policy
#200
of 557 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,863
of 250,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Public Health Policy
#5
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,608,085 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 557 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,796 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.