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Density effect on great tit (Parus major) clutch size intensifies in a polluted environment

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, July 2013
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

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2 tweeters

Citations

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18 Mendeley
Title
Density effect on great tit (Parus major) clutch size intensifies in a polluted environment
Published in
Oecologia, July 2013
DOI 10.1007/s00442-013-2732-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tapio Eeva, Esa Lehikoinen

Abstract

Long-term data on a great tit (Parus major) population breeding in a metal-polluted zone around a copper-nickel smelter indicate that, against expectations, the clutch size of this species is decreasing even though metal emissions in the area have decreased considerably over the past two decades. Here, we document long-term population-level changes in the clutch size of P. major and explore if changes in population density, population numbers of competing species, timing of breeding, breeding habitat, or female age distribution can explain decreasing clutch sizes. Clutch size of P. major decreased by one egg in the polluted zone during the past 21 years, while there was no significant change in clutch size in the unpolluted reference zone over this time period. Density of P. major nests was similar in both environments but increased threefold during the study period in both areas (from 0.8 to 2.4 nest/ha). In the polluted zone, clutch size has decreased as a response to a considerable increase in population density, while a corresponding density change in the unpolluted zone did not have such an effect. The other factors studied did not explain the clutch size trend. Fledgling numbers in the polluted environment have been relatively low since the beginning of the study period, and they do not show a corresponding decrease to that noted for the clutch size over the same time period. Our study shows that responses of commonly measured life-history parameters to anthropogenic pollution depend on the structure of the breeding population. Interactions between pollution and intrinsic population characters should therefore be taken into account in environmental studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 6%
Romania 1 6%
Unknown 16 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 33%
Student > Bachelor 4 22%
Student > Master 4 22%
Researcher 3 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 67%
Environmental Science 4 22%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 June 2018.
All research outputs
#8,135,580
of 14,145,010 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#2,232
of 3,042 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,300
of 253,386 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#30
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,145,010 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,042 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,386 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.