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Prognosis of cirrhotic patients admitted to intensive care unit: a meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Intensive Care, March 2017
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80 Mendeley
Title
Prognosis of cirrhotic patients admitted to intensive care unit: a meta-analysis
Published in
Annals of Intensive Care, March 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13613-017-0249-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Delphine Weil, Eric Levesque, Marc McPhail, Rodrigo Cavallazzi, Eleni Theocharidou, Evangelos Cholongitas, Arnaud Galbois, Heng Chih Pan, Constantine J. Karvellas, Bertrand Sauneuf, René Robert, Jérome Fichet, Gaël Piton, Thierry Thevenot, Gilles Capellier, Vincent Di Martino

Abstract

The best predictors of short- and medium-term mortality of cirrhotic patients receiving intensive care support are unknown. We conducted meta-analyses from 13 studies (2523 cirrhotics) after selection of original articles and response to a standardized questionnaire by the corresponding authors. End-points were in-ICU, in-hospital, and 6-month mortality in ICU survivors. A total of 301 pooled analyses, including 95 analyses restricted to 6-month mortality among ICU survivors, were conducted considering 249 variables (including reason for admission, organ replacement therapy, and composite prognostic scores). In-ICU, in-hospital, and 6-month mortality was 42.7, 54.1, and 75.1%, respectively. Forty-eight patients (3.8%) underwent liver transplantation during follow-up. In-ICU mortality was lower in patients admitted for variceal bleeding (OR 0.46; 95% CI 0.36-0.59; p < 0.001) and higher in patients with SOFA > 19 at baseline (OR 8.54; 95% CI 2.09-34.91; p < 0.001; PPV = 0.93). High SOFA no longer predicted mortality at 6 months in ICU survivors. Twelve variables related to infection were predictors of in-ICU mortality, including SIRS (OR 2.44; 95% CI 1.64-3.65; p < 0.001; PPV = 0.57), pneumonia (OR 2.18; 95% CI 1.47-3.22; p < 0.001; PPV = 0.69), sepsis-associated refractory oliguria (OR 10.61; 95% CI 4.07-27.63; p < 0.001; PPV = 0.76), and fungal infection (OR 4.38; 95% CI 1.11-17.24; p < 0.001; PPV = 0.85). Among therapeutics, only dopamine (OR 5.57; 95% CI 3.02-10.27; p < 0.001; PPV = 0.68), dobutamine (OR 8.92; 95% CI 3.32-23.96; p < 0.001; PPV = 0.86), epinephrine (OR 5.03; 95% CI 2.68-9.42; p < 0.001; PPV = 0.77), and MARS (OR 2.07; 95% CI 1.22-3.53; p = 0.007; PPV = 0.58) were associated with in-ICU mortality without heterogeneity. In ICU survivors, eight markers of liver and renal failure predicted 6-month mortality, including Child-Pugh stage C (OR 2.43; 95% CI 1.44-4.10; p < 0.001; PPV = 0.57), baseline MELD > 26 (OR 3.97; 95% CI 1.92-8.22; p < 0.0001; PPV = 0.75), and hepatorenal syndrome (OR 4.67; 95% CI 1.24-17.64; p = 0.022; PPV = 0.88). Prognosis of cirrhotic patients admitted to ICU is poor since only a minority undergo liver transplant. The prognostic performance of general ICU scores decreases over time, unlike the Child-Pugh and MELD scores, even recorded in the context of organ failure. Infection-related parameters had a short-term impact, whereas liver and renal failure had a sustained impact on mortality.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 80 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 20%
Other 13 16%
Student > Postgraduate 7 9%
Student > Master 6 8%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Other 17 21%
Unknown 16 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 45 56%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 23 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2018.
All research outputs
#13,035,655
of 22,965,074 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Intensive Care
#686
of 1,050 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,946
of 309,320 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Intensive Care
#18
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,965,074 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,050 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.8. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,320 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.