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The reward of a good joke: neural correlates of viewing dynamic displays of stand-up comedy

Overview of attention for article published in Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience, July 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#23 of 703)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
24 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
102 Mendeley
Title
The reward of a good joke: neural correlates of viewing dynamic displays of stand-up comedy
Published in
Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience, July 2011
DOI 10.3758/s13415-011-0049-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert G. Franklin, Reginald B. Adams

Abstract

Humor is enjoyable, yet few studies to date have reported that humor engages brain regions involved in reward processing (i.e., the mesolimbic reward system). Even fewer have investigated socially relevant, dynamic displays of real actors telling jokes. Instead, many studies have focused on responses to static cartoons or written jokes in isolation. In the present investigation, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine brain activation in response to video clips of comedians performing stand-up comedy, a more socially relevant task than reading jokes or cartoons in isolation. Participants watched video clips of eight stand-up comedians, half female/half male, that were prerated by a separate group of participants from the same population as eliciting either high or low levels of amusement, thereby allowing us to control for comedian attributes and comedic style. We found that high-funny clips elicited more activation in several brain regions involved with reward responses, including the nucleus accumbens, caudate, and putamen. A regression with participants' own ratings of humor revealed similar activity in reward areas as well as in regions involved in theory of mind. These findings indicate that dynamic social displays of humor do engage reward responses. The rewarding nature of humor may help explain why it is so valued socially.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 102 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 4%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 93 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 22%
Student > Master 17 17%
Researcher 12 12%
Student > Bachelor 12 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 11%
Other 28 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 45 44%
Neuroscience 14 14%
Social Sciences 10 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 7%
Other 18 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 March 2019.
All research outputs
#519,481
of 13,444,619 outputs
Outputs from Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
#23
of 703 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,769
of 81,100 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
#1
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,444,619 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 703 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 81,100 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.