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Does perceived steepness deter stair climbing when an alternative is available?

Overview of attention for article published in Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, November 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
6 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
54 Mendeley
Title
Does perceived steepness deter stair climbing when an alternative is available?
Published in
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, November 2013
DOI 10.3758/s13423-013-0535-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Frank F. Eves, Susannah K. S. Thorpe, Amanda Lewis, Guy A. H. Taylor-Covill

Abstract

Perception of hill slant is exaggerated in explicit awareness. Proffitt (Perspectives on Psychological Science 1:110-122, 2006) argued that explicit perception of the slant of a climb allows individuals to plan locomotion in keeping with their available locomotor resources, yet no behavioral evidence supports this contention. Pedestrians in a built environment can often avoid climbing stairs, the man-made equivalent of steep hills, by choosing an adjacent escalator. Stair climbing is avoided more by women, the old, and the overweight than by their comparators. Two studies tested perceived steepness of the stairs as a cue that promotes this avoidance. In the first study, participants estimated the steepness of a staircase in a train station (n = 269). Sex, age, height, and weight were recorded. Women, older individuals, and those who were heavier and shorter reported the staircase as steeper than did their comparison groups. In a follow-up study in a shopping mall, pedestrians were recruited from those who chose the stairs and those who avoided them, with the samples stratified for sex, age, and weight status. Participants (n = 229) estimated the steepness of a life-sized image of the stairs they had just encountered, presented on the wall of a vacant shop in the mall. Pedestrians who avoided stair climbing by choosing the escalator reported the stairs as steeper even when demographic differences were controlled. Perceived steepness may to be a contextual cue that pedestrians use to avoid stair climbing when an alternative is available.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Unknown 52 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 20%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Researcher 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 14 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 18 33%
Unspecified 6 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 11%
Sports and Recreations 6 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 9%
Other 13 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 January 2018.
All research outputs
#625,103
of 13,561,017 outputs
Outputs from Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
#145
of 1,644 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,111
of 184,610 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
#6
of 56 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,561,017 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,644 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 184,610 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 56 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.