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Key Intervention Characteristics in e-Health: Steps Towards Standardized Communication

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, April 2017
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36 Mendeley
Title
Key Intervention Characteristics in e-Health: Steps Towards Standardized Communication
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, April 2017
DOI 10.1007/s12529-016-9630-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bridgette M. Bewick, Steven J. Ondersma, Mette T. Hoybye, Oskar Blakstad, Matthijs Blankers, Håvar Brendryen, Pål F. Helland, Ayna B. Johansen, Paul Wallace, Kristina Sinadinovic, Christopher Sundstrom, Anne H Berman

Abstract

This paper reports expert opinion on e-health intervention characteristics that enable effective communication of characteristics across the diverse field of e-health interventions. The paper presents a visualization tool to support communication of the defining characteristics. An initial list of e-health intervention characteristics was developed through an iterative process of item generation and discussion among the 12 authors. The list was distributed to 123 experts in the field, who were emailed an invitation to assess and rank the items. Participants were asked to evaluate these characteristics in three separate ways. A total of 50 responses were received for a response rate of 40.7%. Six respondents who reported having little or no expertise in e-health research were removed from the dataset. Our results suggest that 10 specific intervention characteristics were consistently supported as of central importance by the panel of 44 e-intervention experts. The weight and perceived relevance of individual items differed between experts; oftentimes, this difference is a result of the individual theoretical perspective and/or behavioral target of interest. The first iteration of the visualization of salient characteristics represents an ambitious effort to develop a tool that will support communication of the defining characteristics for e-health interventions aimed to assist e-health developers and researchers to communicate the key characteristics of their interventions in a standardized manner that facilitates dialog.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 9 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 25%
Researcher 4 11%
Other 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 11 31%
Psychology 7 19%
Computer Science 4 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Other 9 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 April 2017.
All research outputs
#8,166,580
of 13,022,627 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Medicine
#339
of 533 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,233
of 263,962 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Medicine
#6
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,022,627 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 533 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,962 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.