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Current status of drug therapies for osteoporosis and the search for stem cells adapted for bone regenerative medicine

Overview of attention for article published in Anatomical Science International, October 2013
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Title
Current status of drug therapies for osteoporosis and the search for stem cells adapted for bone regenerative medicine
Published in
Anatomical Science International, October 2013
DOI 10.1007/s12565-013-0208-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yoshikazu Mikami, Taro Matsumoto, Koichiro Kano, Taku Toriumi, Masanori Somei, Masaki J. Honda, Kazuo Komiyama

Abstract

A number of factors can lead to bone disorders such as osteoporosis, in which the balance of bone resorption vs. bone formation is upset (i.e., more bone is resorbed than is formed). The result is a loss of bone mass, with a concomitant decrease in bone density. Drugs for osteoporosis can be broadly classified as "bone resorption inhibitors", which impede bone resorption by osteoclasts, and "bone formation accelerators", which augment bone formation by osteoblasts. Here, we describe representative drugs in each class, i.e., the bisphosphonates and the parathyroid hormone. In addition, we introduce two novel bone formation accelerators, SST-VEDI and SSH-BMI, which are currently under investigation by our research group. On the other hand, regenerative therapy, characterized by (ideally) the use of a patient's own cells to regenerate lost tissue, is now a matter of global interest. At present, candidate cell sources for regenerative therapy include embryonic stem cells (created from embryos based on the fertilization of oocytes), induced pluripotent stem cells (created artificially by using somatic cells as the starting material), and somatic stem cells (found in the tissues of the adult body). This review summarizes the identifying features and the therapeutic potential of each of these stem cell types for bone regenerative medicine. Although a number of different kinds of somatic stem cells have been reported, we turn our attention toward two that are of particular interest for prospective applications in bone repair: the dedifferentiated fat cell, and the deciduous dental pulp-derived stem cell.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 23%
Unspecified 4 18%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Other 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 36%
Unspecified 4 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 18%
Materials Science 2 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Other 3 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2013.
All research outputs
#9,864,484
of 12,355,000 outputs
Outputs from Anatomical Science International
#67
of 104 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#114,743
of 170,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Anatomical Science International
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,355,000 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 104 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.3. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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