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Engaging with Dementia: Moral Experiments in Art and Friendship

Overview of attention for article published in Culture, Medicine & Psychiatry, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 418)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
17 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
Title
Engaging with Dementia: Moral Experiments in Art and Friendship
Published in
Culture, Medicine & Psychiatry, April 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11013-017-9528-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Janelle S. Taylor

Abstract

The box-office as well as critical success of the 2014 major motion picture Still Alice, starring Julianne Moore in the title role and based on the bestselling novel of the same name by the Harvard-trained neuroscientist Lisa Genova (Still Alice. Simon & Schuster, New York, 2009), marked an important moment in public cultural representations of people with dementia. Still Alice tells the story of Alice Howland, an eminent scientist whose increasing memory lapses are eventually diagnosed as early-onset Alzheimer's, and chronicles the transformations in her family relationships as her husband and three children respond to her decline in different ways. Alice's husband, her son, and her older daughter all respond by turning toward science, while her younger daughter Lydia seeks to engage her mother as she is now, and turns toward art and relationships. Taking Still Alice and the figure of Lydia as an entry point, I discuss arts-focused efforts to improve the lives of people with dementia, and draw upon ongoing interview-based research on the topic of dementia and friendship, to offer an account of some of the ways that people I have spoken with are actively experimenting with art and with relationships in the face of dementia. I argue that these efforts can be understood as "moral experiements," in the sense articulated by Cheryl Mattingly (Moral Laboratories: Family Peril and the Struggle for a Good Life. University of California Press, Berkeley, 2014). Although Lydia is a fictional character, her response to Alice's dementia points toward the kinds of moral experimentation that are in fact possible, and quietly being practiced, by ordinary people every day.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 27%
Unspecified 5 19%
Student > Master 4 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 15%
Other 2 8%
Other 4 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 10 38%
Unspecified 5 19%
Arts and Humanities 4 15%
Psychology 4 15%
Computer Science 1 4%
Other 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 126. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 July 2017.
All research outputs
#102,307
of 12,404,173 outputs
Outputs from Culture, Medicine & Psychiatry
#1
of 418 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,293
of 262,622 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Culture, Medicine & Psychiatry
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,404,173 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 418 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,622 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them